Calladitas No More

Men Can’t Be Scum On Facebook, But Women Sure Can

Since the launch of the #MeToo movement, women have taken to social media to share their personal stories os sexual assault and harassment and express their exasperation with men. These online revelations of abuse, rape, and harassment have rightfully derailed the careers of various powerful names across different industries and shined a light on the fact that in today’s male-driven world, women are unsafe. Still, in spite of the therapeutic and healing nature of these revelations that are doubling as a plea to have our voices heard, Facebook has been suspending women for posts of ironic misandry — or, what the social network calls “hate speech” – against men.

Facebook has been banning women for innocuous comments similar to the phrase “men are scum.”

An in-depth article by the Daily Beast highlighted Facebook’s habit of banning the accounts of women who post variations of messages like “men are trash,” “men are the worst,” and “men are scum.” All of which can be easily recognized as ironic misandry. Mostly these posts are created as a means of angered self-expression calling out the injustice of living in a world where we regularly face abusive behavior from men.

Ban by ban, Facebook is debunking the notion that its platform is the ultimate great equalizer of the internet.

In business years, Facebook, which was created in 2004, is still a baby. Still, many have seen how the company has had a monster impact on amplifying the voices of disenfranchised groups and somewhat leveled the playing field on which voices are heard via its platform. But, many of the women whose posts and accounts have gotten the boot from the site are bringing our attention to Facebook’s questionable ethics.

Facebook’s moderation policies censor slurs as well as attacks against “protected categories,” such as race, sexual orientation, sex, gender identity, national origins, religion, as well as diseases and disabilities that are more serious. Factors such as a person’s occupation, social class, age, political affiliation, and appearance are unprotected categories because, according to Facebook, they’re not as closely related to identity. All of this means that that slurs against white men (which checks off the protected categories of race and sex) are seen as hate speech. Meanwhile the social media site continues to allow groups and posts that are unequivocally “pro-white” to run rampant across its platform.

And this censorship is happening quite often. 

In a piece written for another publication, one of FIERCE‘s own editors wrote an article in the wake of the onslaught of harassment allegations by women and encouraged men to do better. The piece, titled “Dear dudes, you’re all trash,” was removed by Facebook from the publication San Diego CityBeat’s page as well as from the author’s page and others that shared it.

Women on Twitter are less than impressed by the Facebook bans.

Many women are accusing the platform of acting quickly to censor their words without further evaluation, while also failing to examine groups, pages, and people whose words and actions have clearly amounted to harassment and abuse.

Some have suggested even protesting the platform for its silencing of women.

Others have pointed out the irony of Facebook’s decision to silence women who’ve been experiencing harassment and abuse in the past.

Many have said that deleting these women’s posts and simultaneously suspending their accounts is comparable to the many industries that have silenced women from speaking up about their own experiences.

According to the Daily Beast, a Facebook spokesperson said that they would “look at ways to apply our policies in a more granular way, for instance to take into account the history of oppression with different genders and ethnicities, etc. when reviewing posts. But we are a global platform.”


Read: The Women Of The #MeToo Movement, Including A Mexican Strawberry Picker, Are Time’s ‘Person Of The Year’

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Tomi Lahren And Stephanie Hamill Have Publicly Shaded Or Shamed Cardi B For Her Vocal Politics, And Both Were Left Annihilated

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Tomi Lahren And Stephanie Hamill Have Publicly Shaded Or Shamed Cardi B For Her Vocal Politics, And Both Were Left Annihilated

Don’t come for Bronx women. Cardi B has warned the world before, yet conservative white women are still trying to square off with the rapper and expecting to come out on top. In the last week, both Tomi Lahren and Stephanie Hamill have publicly shaded or shamed Cardi for her vocal politics, and both were left annihilated after the ‘hood Einstein hit them with verbal jabs.

It started on Wednesday, when Lahren, a Fox Nation host and supporter of Donald Trump, tweeted that the “Money” rapper was the “latest genius political mind to endorse Democrats,” trying to disparage the artist’s political intelligence. She was responding to a video Cardi had posted on Instagram where she criticized the president for initiating the longest government shutdown in US history and expecting government employees to work without pay.

Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar, never one to stay silent for too long after a slight, fired back, warning, “Leave me alone I will dog walk you.”

Lahren, with her entitlement and affinity for controversy always present, responded, “I’m sure you would. Still doesn’t make your political rambling any less moronic. #BuildthatWall”

Then, just as Cardi had alerted her, she linguistically dragged tf out of Lahren.

“You’re so blinded with racism that you don’t even realize the decisions the president you root for is destroying the country you claim to love so much .You are a perfect example on no matter how educated or smart you think you are you still a SHEEP,” she shot off to Lahren, who has yet to respond.

Instead, on Monday, another white conservative commentator thirsty to feed off of Cardi’s stardom came for the Dominican-Trinidadian act, this time both minimizing her intelligence and slut-shaming her.

Also on Twitter, Fox News host Stephanie Hamill tweeted a video of Cardi’s latest song “Twerk” and asked, “In the Era of #meToo how exactly does this empower women? Leftists, @iamcardib , feel free to chime in. THX ..”

Belcalis didn’t hesitate to reply, giving the lost Hamill a quick lesson on feminism in the process.

“It says to women that I can wear and not wear what ever I want. do [whatever] I want and that NO still means NO. So Stephanie chime in..If I twerk and be half naked does that mean I deserve to get raped and molested ? I want to know what a conservative woman like you thinks,” she wrote.

Hamill, who thought it acceptable to criticize a woman and then ask her to help her ratings by appearing on her show, responded with alleged concern that sexually empowered women are harmful because, to her, sexual women can’t be intelligent or demand respect.

“I agree, No means NO, NO MATTER what! But this video, & others like this sexually objectify women. I think this hurts all women & the cause. We’re not sex OBJECTS! Clearly we see things differently, (maybe I’m just a hater bc I can’t Twerk ????) Come on my show, debate me!”

No word yet on whether Cardi will take Hamill up on her offer (fingers crossed she says hell nah and continues using her own social media, where she already has millions of followers, for her astute political takes), but let her clapbacks send a signal to all conservative white commentators to leave her tf alone.

Read: Senators Were Hilariously Torn About Sharing Cardi B’s Expletive-Laden Video Denouncing The Government Shutdown

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When Emma Gonzalez Leads The March For Our Lives, She’ll Be Following In The Footsteps Of These Latina Civil Rights Leaders

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When Emma Gonzalez Leads The March For Our Lives, She’ll Be Following In The Footsteps Of These Latina Civil Rights Leaders

As you gear up and rally to march for our lives this weekend, you might be completely in awe of the power and effect of Emma Gonzalez. The high school student from Parkland, Fl has, along with the great efforts of her peers, rallied cities and communities across the globe to fight back against the NRA and the inaction of political leaders who have long held the power to put an end to gun violence. For many of us, it’s exciting to see a Latina show the world that once again we are forces to be reckoned with. But long before Gonzalez called B.S. and became the face of a growing national movement, other Latina activists had a huge hand in changing the course of our history.

Here’s a look at seven of some of history’s most powerful Latina activists who led marches and fought for your civil rights.

Sylvia Mendez

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When it comes to the desegregation of schools in the country, American history often credits the case of Brown v. Board of Education for the changes. Barbara Rose Johns is also the one who is most typically considered to be the face of that movement after she led a 450-student walkout at a high school in Virginia in 1951.

But history has largely written out the work of Sylvia Mendez an American civil rights activists of Mexican and Puerto Rican descent who played a key role in the integration movement back in 1946.

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Mendez v. Westminster was a case sparked by Mendez’s rejection from an all-white school in California back in 1943 when she was just eight years old. Mendez’s parents sued the school district and the landmark case which was ultimately settled in 1947 successfully desegregated public schools  in California making it the first U.S. state to do so.

Dolores Huerta

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As a fierce civil rights activist and labor leader, Dolores Huerta became a tireless advocate of the United Farm Workers union. The American-born Latina of Mexican descent originally started out her career as an elementary school teacher. After seeing kids in her class come to school hungry and in need of new shoes, she decided she would help organize their parents.

She started to fight for economic improvements for Latino farm workers and pressed local government organizations to improve barrio conditions.

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In 1962, she co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (now known as the United Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee) with César Chávez. Her non-violent strikes and protests led to her 22 arrests. In 1997 she was named one of the three most important women of the year in by Ms. magazine.

Carmen Perez

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In 2017, Perez helped lead the country in its largest protest in U.S. history as a co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington.

In her 20 year career as an activist, Perez has dedicated her advocacy to some of today’s most important civil rights issues including violence against women, mass incarceration, gender inequality and community policing.

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Before the Women’s March she helped launch a 9-day 250-mile march from New York City to Washington, DC called March2Justice which implored congressional lawmakers to turn their attention to the nation’s police justice crisis.

Berta Cáceres

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Best known for leading a campaign that opposed a dam on the Gualcarque River, Cáceres was an award-winning Indigenous environmental activist. In 2015, the Honduran environmentalist received the Goldman Environmental Prize for helming the grassroots effort that pushed the world’s largest dam builder to stop the construction of the Agua Zarca Dam at the Río Gualcarque.

Because of her efforts the river that was saved and considered to be sacred by the Lenca people, was still able to provide the nearby tribe access to water, food, and medicine.

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On March 3, 2016, Berta Cáceres was assassinated for her activism when two assailants broke into her home and shot her. Her murder sparked international outrage and brought attention to the fact that Honduras is the most dangerous country in the world for activists who fight to protect forests and rivers.

The Mirabal Sisters

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Patria, Dedé, Minerva, and María Teresa Mirabal were four sisters from the Dominican Republic who ferociously opposed the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo and became known as Las Mariposas. In 1959, after witnessing a = massacre executed by the Trujillo regime the sisters were sparked into activism and rallied communities into public protests that renounced Trujillo’s rule.

Three of the sisters, Minerva, María Teresa, and Patria, were murdered for their advocacy when they were beaten to death by associates of the government.

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Following the death of Las Mariposas, Dominicans across the island decided they had had enough. Six months later, Trujillo’s dictatorship was brought down when he was assassinated.

Sylvia Rivera 

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Well before activists like Harvey Milk and figures like Caitlyn Jenner made waves, there was Sylvia Rivera. The Latina born and raised in New York City had Puerto Rican and Venezuelan roots and a tragic story when she first began to carve out a place for trans people in the American gay liberation movement. 

Rivera was a self-identified drag queen and transwoman who participated in the Stonewall riots of 1969 and soon after founded Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with Marsha P. Johnson.

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In 1970 she led trans activists in the country’s first Gay Pride march, then known as Christopher Street Liberation Day March and in the years after she delivered fervent speeches that called for the support of LGBTQ people of color and who were homeless.


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