Calladitas No More

Salma Hayek Describes Harvey Weinstein As A ‘Monster’ In A Heartbreaking Essay About How He Harassed Her

When news surrounding the Harvey Weinstein scandal unfolded, many of us watched in dismay as woman after woman stepped forward to share their harrowing accounts of sexual assault, harassment, and intimidation at the hands of the notorious Hollywood producer. Ashely Judd, Minka Kelly, and Lupita Nyong’o are just three of the 30-plus women rounding out the list of his accusers.

However, Salma Hayek, whose breakthrough role came from the the Harvey Weinstein-produced film “Frida” and who appeared in six films released by his company, was notably silent. Streams of women had stepped up to accuse the producer of abuse, but even when evidence that she had been harassed by one of his own supporters quickly came to light, the actress remained quiet.

The Mexican actress has now broken her silence via an essay she penned for the New York Times. She details the agonizing story of how Weinstein terrorized her throughout the early start of her career and throughout the process of making “Frida.”

Hayek’s essay opens with an explanation on why she remained quiet about her experience with Weinstein up until now.

In her essay, titled “Harvey Weinstein Is My Monster Too,” Hayek describes feeling like a survivor, and that her trauma was over.

She adds, “I hid from the responsibility to speak out with the excuse that enough people were already involved in shining a light on my monster. I didn’t consider my voice important, nor did I think it would make a difference.”

She then chronicles the slew of sexual requests she received from Weinstein, which Hayek repeatedly refused.

“No to opening the door to him at all hours of the night, hotel after hotel, location after location, where he would show up unexpectedly, including one location where I was doing a movie he wasn’t even involved with,” she recounts.

It also included rejecting his requests to massage her, shower with him, watch her shower, have a naked friend massage her, performing oral sex on her and getting naked with a woman.

Those no’s incited “Harvey’s Machiavellian rage.”

Hayek confesses the terror she experienced when, after spurning him again, he threatened to kill her.

“In his eyes, I was not an artist. I wasn’t even a person,” she says. “I was a thing: not a nobody, but a body.”

She goes on to detail a series of events in which a vengeful Weinstein attempted to completely push Hayek out of “Frida.” All this despite she having researched and worked on the film tirelessly for years, and the various blazing hoops the actress hurled herself through to ensure the its completion, including negotiating with the Mexican government for access to never before approved filming locations.

At one point, Hayek describes the soul-crushing moment Weinstein demanded she do a full-frontal sex scene, threatening to pull his resources from the film entirely if she didn’t oblige.

“We paid the price for standing up to him nearly every day of shooting,” Hayek writes. “It was clear to me he would never let me finish this movie without him having his fantasy one way or another. There was no room for negotiation.”

The response to Hayek’s essay has been filled with support.

And in turn, women have found support and inspiration from Hayek’s words for themselves.

For many, Hayek’s confession and the movement that spurred it acts as a note of optimism on women’s future.

Hayek’s story is packed to the brim with grief but it also highlights the need for feminism to penetrate male-dominated industries.

“Until there is equality in our industry, with men and women having the same value in every aspect of it, our community will continue to be a fertile ground for predators,” Hayek writes, expressing hope that her story will help raise the many voices that have and will shed light on a tragic problem so many women face.


Read: Bella Thorne’s Unexpected Sexual Assault Reveal Is A Lesson To Slut Shamers On Sympathy

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below! 

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Women In Mexico Have Started Their Own #MeToo Movement

fierce

Women In Mexico Have Started Their Own #MeToo Movement

The #MeToo Movement has arrived in Mexico.

Last week, a young activist tweeted that an esteemed writer had beaten or raped more than 10 women, with her post inspiring hundreds of others to speak out about violence and harassment in their industries.

Ana G. González, a 29-year-old political communications consultant, tweeted on March 21 that Herson Barona had “beaten, manipulated, gaslighted, impregnated, and abandoned (on more than one occasion) more than 10 women.” While she didn’t experience the violence firsthand, she said that women had asked her to speak out on their behalf.

“I knew several women that were just too afraid and not ready to come forth, but allowed me to speak for them and name this person,” González told the New York Times.

Barona denied the accusations, saying “I understand that there is collective pain surrounding the real cases of so many beaten, raped and murdered women” and “unfortunately, in public scorn there is little space for discussion, clarity or conciliation.”

His response didn’t slow down the derision he, and others who have been recently been accused of gender violence and harassment, received on the social network, however.

Since González’s tweet, more allegations have followed under the hashtag #MeTooEscritores, where women are sharing their stories of abuse in film, academia, the nonprofit sector, business, law, theater, medicine, politics and more.

Some women, fearing a backlash from their jobs or their perpetrator, are speaking anonymously or not sharing their attacker’s name. But others, who shared details in their accounts, have caught the attention of the attorney general’s office in the state of Michoacán, which is investigating information published on social media by a network of journalists that “includes acts that Mexican laws consider as crimes.”

Last year, during the height of the #MeToo movement in the US, Mexican actress Karla Souza, famous for her role as Laurel Castillo on the US legal drama television series How to Get Away With Murder, disclosed that she was raped by a director while working in Mexico. She chose to not share the name of her aggressor, which incited skepticism and criticism from many, sending a message to those who might have wanted to open up about their experience with workplace violence or harassment that they, too, could risk similar reprisal.

“When you see how these women have been treated publicly, it makes perfect sense many victims want to protect themselves by staying anonymous,” González said. “Let’s just hope this time it will be different.”

Read: Twitter Is On Fire With The ‘Me Too’ Hashtag And Latinas Refuse To Be Forgotten

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below!

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Salma Hayek Says Those Who Are Skeptical About Her Marriage To French Billionaire Are “Showing Racism”

fierce

Salma Hayek Says Those Who Are Skeptical About Her Marriage To French Billionaire Are “Showing Racism”

If you’re out here making judgements about Salma Hayek and her billionaire husband François-Henri Pinault, here’s a tip: don’t.

In an interview with Town & Country, the Mexican actress suggested that skepticism around her romance is a sign of bigotry.

“A lot of people are very shocked that I married who I married,” Hayek, 52, said. “And some people are even intimidated now by me. But it’s another way of showing racism. They can’t believe this Mexican ended up in the life that she has, and they’re uncomfortable around me.”

@salmahayek / Instagram

While “this Mexican” is herself an affluent megastar, her Hollywood-earned millions is apparently loose change compared to Pinault, who’s worth an estimated $7 billion. The French businessman, who Hayek tied the knot with in 2009, heads the Kering conglomerate, which oversees high-profile fashion brands like Gucci and Yves Saint-Laurent and is the son of one of France’s richest men, Francois Pinault.

Hayek isn’t letting her haters faze her, though. She told the luxury magazine that she’s living a romantic fairytale, but one that she refuses to share too much about.

“[Pinault] is the best husband in the world,” she said. “I get to be who I am with him, and I don’t feel that somebody tries to limit me. I’m not going to tell you [how we met]. It’s such a romantic, amazing story, but it is mine. I don’t want to vulgarize it by making it into a story to make myself interesting.”

Last August, Hayek and Pinault, who have 11-year-old daughter Valentina Paloma together, renewed their vows in Bora Bora. Pinault, 56, surprised the actress with a beachside ceremony, where Hayek donned a red gown and carried a bouquet of white flowers.

@salmahayek / Instagram

While the Mexican-Lebanese talent is happily married, she’s still bad all on her own. Hayek spoke with Town & Country to promote her film “The Hummingbird Project,” a Canadian-Belgium drama thriller premiering in the US on March 15. It’s the latest in the Oscar-nominated actress’s filmography, which includes fan favorites like “Frida,” “Dogma,” “From Dusk Till Dawn,” “Traffic,” “Grown Ups” and more.

Read: Netflix Is Turning Gabriel García Márquez’s Classic ‘One Hundred Years of Solitude’ Into A Series

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below!

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *