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Here’s Why Camila Cabello’s Openness About Her OCD Is So Important For Latina Youth

Sometimes, no matter how much older and more independent you might be, you find that you’re just a girl who just needs her mom. In a recent interview with Cosmopolitan UK, Camila Cabello opened up about why, even at 21, she makes sure to bring her mother with her wherever she goes and she has me feeling completely seen.

Cabello might be a chart-topper but she admits that even on her best day she still wants her mom.

i'm a cosmo gyal ?? @cosmopolitanuk ?

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This summer, the Cuban-born singer of “Havana” will be hitting the road and joining Taylor Swift’s Reputation Tour. Her mom will be tagging along too and according her latest interview Cosmopolitan UK, it’s a decision the singer has made all on her own. “It’s the hardest part–being away from my family. I would never want to move to LA because I can’t live away from them,” Cabello explains sharing that whenever she travels, she makes sure to bring her mom with her.

“It’s really nice, she’s my best friend,” Cabello admits. “My other half. There’s something about being with your mom. You just feel like a kid. And your family doesn’t care if you’ve messed up or you flopped or if your song tanked. They love you no matter what and that’s so important to me.”

The singer also got honest about the value of having her mother around when it comes to dealing with her mental illness.

#NeverBeTheSameTour MERCH ????

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Cabello has open pretty about with fans and media outlets about her struggles with anxiety in the past. In 2016 the singer made headlines when she abruptly left a concert mid-set while performing with her former girl group, Fifth Harmony. She later posted a video to her Snapchat account explaining her absence from stage saying “Was having too much anxiety and couldn’t finish it… I’m truly sorry.”

The Latina went on to describe to the magazine how anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder still affect her. “OCD is weird. I laugh about it now. Everybody has different ways of handling stress,” she explained “And, for me, if I get really stressed thinking about something, I’ll start to have the same thought over and over again, and no matter how many times I get to the resolution, I feel like something bad is about to happen if I don’t keep thinking about it. I didn’t know what it was and when I found out, and [learned] how to step back from it, it made me feel so much better. I feel so much more in control of it now. To the point where I’m just like, ‘Aha! OK, this is just my OCD.’ I’ll ask my mom a question for the fourth time, and she’ll be like, ‘That’s OCD. You’ve got to let it go.'”

Cabello’s decision to use her platform to raise awareness of mental illness is a pretty exciting thing to see for Latina communities.

Many of us spend our whole lives feeling ashamed and forced to conceal the very real disabilities that affect millions of people the world over. In fact, in the United States’ Latino community alone, over 8.9 million people are estimated to be living with a diagnosable mental illness. For Latinas, who have some of the highest rates of suicide attempts in the country, it’s fortifying to see that Cabello isn’t just speaking up about her illness but bringing empathy to those affected by it as well.


Read: Here’s What 2017 Looked Like For Camila Cabello. And Spoiler, It Was Goooood

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Video Dug Up From Cardi B’s Past Shows Her Saying She Used To Drug And Rob Men

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Video Dug Up From Cardi B’s Past Shows Her Saying She Used To Drug And Rob Men

Stay grateful you did not grow up in the era of Snapchat/ Instagram/ Facebook kids because you can delete but your recorded actions can still come back to bite. Cardi B knows the story. While the Afro-Latina queen of Trap isn’ making any apologies, the latest video to be dug up from her past is requiring her to give some answers.

Video of the singer, recalling a time in her life in which she felt forced to drug and rob men while seducing them has resurfaced.

Over the weekend, video of the “Money” rapper recalling how she used to drug and rob men resurfaced.

The video, which was recorded during an Instagram live broadcast, sees Cardi as she goes on a tearful verbal tirade about her past. This after, someone apparently questioned her success and accused her of not “putting in no fucking work.”

“I had to go ‘oh yeah, you wanna fuck me? Yeah yeah yeah let’s go to this hotel.’ And then I’d drug [expletivie] up and I’d rob them. That’s what I used to do.”

Users online were quick to comment.

“The fact that cardi b admitted to drugging and robbing men she would take back to a hotel for sex blows my mind,” wrote Twitter user @itsangelaa. “That’s not ‘keeping it real.’ that’s a crime.”

“I wonder what woulda happened if it were the other way round,” @BTSisthecauseo5 commented.

At the onset of the backlash, the rapper seemed to take the comments rather lightly.

The following day she also tweeted “IM THAT BITCH THEY LOVE TO HATE, IM THAT BITCH THEY HATE TO LOVE and I love it.”

On Tuesday, however, after users on Instagram and Twitter continued to simmer, she was forced to issue comment.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bve_d3sFet7/

In a post to her Instagram, the rapper responded to the comments about the video by saying: “I’m a part of a hip hop culture where you can talk about where you come from talk about the wrong things you had to do to get where you are.”


Read:After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

One year after the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., two students have died in apparent suicides, compelling the community to come together and share mental health resources.

On Saturday, a sophomore at the school, where 17 people were killed in a mass shooting last year, took his own life. One week prior, Sydney Aiello, 19, a recent Stoneman Douglas graduate who lost her best friend in the massacre, also ended her life.

As the Florida’s emergency chief Jared Moskowitz calls for the state Legislature to send more mental health resources for the high school’s students and faculty, calling mental health a “bipartisan issue” on Twitter, the community has stepped in where the state government has been slow to respond.

On Sunday, more than 60 school, county, city, child services and law enforcement officials, as well as mental health specialists, teachers and parents, met for an emergency meeting. Ryan Petty, father of Alaina Petty, a 14-year-old freshman who was murdered on Feb. 14. 2018, said that the school district will be giving parents the “Columbia Protocol, six questions that parents should ask their children, the Miami Herald reports. Based on their answers, they will know what emergency resources are available to them. Additionally, nonprofits are offering free therapy groups and services.

Online, it’s students, former and current, who are using social media to offer resources to those still suffering from the trauma and loss of last year’s school shooting. David Hogg, who graduated from Stoneman Douglas in 2018 and has become a fierce anti-gun advocate, took to Twitter, reminding Parkland students and grads that trauma doesn’t go away quickly.

“Stop saying you’ll get over it,'” he wrote. “You don’t get over something that never should have happened because those that die from gun violence are stolen from us not naturally lost. Trauma and loss don’t just go away, you have to learn to live with it through getting support.”

According to Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, who spoke with Teen Vogue, witnessing traumatic events can lead to symptoms consistent with acute stress disorder, including recurring memories, dreams or nightmares of the event; mood changes; irritability and more. These memories, she adds, can lead to negative thoughts, hopelessness, trouble sleeping and more.

Hogg wants youth to know that these symptoms are normal and that they can be managed through help, like therapy, talking with friends and family, meditation and self-care practices.

He, along with others, shared his own self-care routine.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, know there is help available. For immediate support, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis and are unsure where to turn, you can also reach out to the Crisis Text Line by sending HOME to 741741.

Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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