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Demi Lovato Is Open About How Her Abusive Relationship With Her Father Continues To Impact Her Life

On Sept. 29, Demi Lovato released her highly anticipated sixth album “Tell Me You Love Me,” which includes her hit single “Sorry Not Sorry.” The singer has been a vocal advocate for mental health awareness since announcing her diagnosis of bipolar disorder and, later, launching the Lovato Treatment Scholarship Program to aid those who unable to afford professional treatment for mental health issues.

On her new album, Lovato has a song that talks about her issues with her birth father. Lovato opened up to Rolling Stone about her complicated relationship with her father, the song “Daddy Issues” and her journey with mental health.

“Daddy Issues” might sound like a pop song about having an older lover, but there is much more behind the meaning of the song.

✌? days until #TellMeYouLoveMe! #DaddyIssues #Lonely ?

A post shared by Demi Lovato (@ddlovato) on

Lovato sings: Lucky for you / I got all these daddy issues / What can I do? / I’m going crazy when I’m with you/ Forget all the therapy that I’ve been through / Lucky for you, I got all these daddy issues.

Lovato has previously spoken about her father, Patrick, who died in 2013, and their abusive relationship. In 2015, she talked about her single “Father” from her album “Confident” in a behind-the-scenes video on YouTube. In the video, Lovato discusses Patrick’s mental health issues and how it affected his behavior and their family. The Lovato Treatment Scholarship Program was created by Lovato in honor of her father, Patrick.

In the interview with Rolling Stone, Lovato shared more about her mental health advocacy, recovery from drug addiction, the time she spent on the Hillary Clinton campaign and more. One thing Lovato is clear about is that she is not ashamed to speak openly about her mental health. While she had once been sick of being labeled by her condition, she is now “proud to be bipolar and speak about it.”

“Bipolar is a mood disorder. I deal with mood swings, I deal with episodes of mania, and bipolar-depression phases as well,” Lovato tells Rolling Stone. “But I’ve used my voice to help others, and I feel proud that I’ve been able to do that.”

Lovato is giving her fans and supporters a loose look into her journey with mental health and addiction in the new documentary, “Simply Complicated.” It’s premiers on YouTube Oct. 17. Lovato told Rolling Stone she was not shy about being candid on camera. In fact, the only time cameras weren’t allowed were when Lovato was writing music, but that was so she wouldn’t be distracted.

If you want to learn more about the Lovato Treatment Scholarship Program tap here.

If you or someone you know needs help, contact the Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

(H/T: RollingStone)


READ: Demi Lovato Is Global Citizen’s Newest Mental Health Ambassador And What Inspired Her To Work With Children In Iraq Might Make You Tear Up

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

One year after the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., two students have died in apparent suicides, compelling the community to come together and share mental health resources.

On Saturday, a sophomore at the school, where 17 people were killed in a mass shooting last year, took his own life. One week prior, Sydney Aiello, 19, a recent Stoneman Douglas graduate who lost her best friend in the massacre, also ended her life.

As the Florida’s emergency chief Jared Moskowitz calls for the state Legislature to send more mental health resources for the high school’s students and faculty, calling mental health a “bipartisan issue” on Twitter, the community has stepped in where the state government has been slow to respond.

On Sunday, more than 60 school, county, city, child services and law enforcement officials, as well as mental health specialists, teachers and parents, met for an emergency meeting. Ryan Petty, father of Alaina Petty, a 14-year-old freshman who was murdered on Feb. 14. 2018, said that the school district will be giving parents the “Columbia Protocol, six questions that parents should ask their children, the Miami Herald reports. Based on their answers, they will know what emergency resources are available to them. Additionally, nonprofits are offering free therapy groups and services.

Online, it’s students, former and current, who are using social media to offer resources to those still suffering from the trauma and loss of last year’s school shooting. David Hogg, who graduated from Stoneman Douglas in 2018 and has become a fierce anti-gun advocate, took to Twitter, reminding Parkland students and grads that trauma doesn’t go away quickly.

“Stop saying you’ll get over it,'” he wrote. “You don’t get over something that never should have happened because those that die from gun violence are stolen from us not naturally lost. Trauma and loss don’t just go away, you have to learn to live with it through getting support.”

According to Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, who spoke with Teen Vogue, witnessing traumatic events can lead to symptoms consistent with acute stress disorder, including recurring memories, dreams or nightmares of the event; mood changes; irritability and more. These memories, she adds, can lead to negative thoughts, hopelessness, trouble sleeping and more.

Hogg wants youth to know that these symptoms are normal and that they can be managed through help, like therapy, talking with friends and family, meditation and self-care practices.

He, along with others, shared his own self-care routine.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, know there is help available. For immediate support, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis and are unsure where to turn, you can also reach out to the Crisis Text Line by sending HOME to 741741.

Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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It’s The Beginning Of The Year And Cardi B and Selena Gomez Have Already Topped Spotify’s Most-Streamed Female Artists

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It’s The Beginning Of The Year And Cardi B and Selena Gomez Have Already Topped Spotify’s Most-Streamed Female Artists

In celebration of International Women’s Day, Spotify released a list of the music streaming service’s most-popular female artists, and it’s filled with Latina singers.

The platform, which has tens of millions of subscribers from across the world, including Latin American countries like Brazil, Chile, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Peru and the Dominican Republic, created catalogs for its most-streamed female artists worldwide and in the US between January 1 and March 1 of 2019.

Globally, Dominicana-Trinidadian rapper Cardi B came out higher than any other Latina artist at No. 8, unsurprisingly as the Bronx hitmaker followed her 2018 platinum debut album “Invasion of Privacy” with several more bangers like “Money” and, most recently,” “Please Me” with Bruno Mars.

@iamcardib / Instagram

Behind Cardi is Selena Gomez (No. 9), whose 2018 hits “Taki Taki” and “Back To You” continue to dominate just about everyone’s playlists.

Latin American artists also made the list, with colombiana Karol G at 13. Cuban-Mexican breakout Camila Cabello followed at 14, Chicana Becky G at 16 and Demi Lovato at 18.

@karolg / Instagram

Similar to Spotify’s worldwide streams, there were also six Latinas on the platform’s 20 most-listened to female artists in the US.

Once again, Belcalis Marlenis Almanzar leads her compañeras, this time making the top five at No. 4. Following behind her is Kehlani (No. 9), Camila Cabello (No. 10), Selena Gomez (No. 12), Demi Lovato (No. 16) and the Puerto Rican-Mexican singer-songwriter Julia Michaels at No. 18.

The list shows the growing strength of Latinas in music, especially the rise of Spanish-language urbano hits, as artists like Cardi (“I Like It”), Selena (“Taki Taki”), Camila (“Havana”), Karol G (“Mi Cama”), Becky G (“Sin Pijama”) and Demi Lovato’s (“Échame La Culpa”) chart-toppers in the last year were partly or fully sung in Spanish.

@kehlani / Instagram

Check out Spotify’s full lists of the most-streamed female artists of 2019 worldwide and in the US below.

The 20 most-streamed female artists in the world:

1. Ariana Grande

2. Billie Eilish

3. Lady Gaga

4. Halsey

5. Dua Lipa

6. Taylor Swift

7. Rihanna

8. Cardi B

9. Selena Gomez

10. Nicki Minaj

11. Sia

12. Bebe Rexha

13. Karol G

14. Camila Cabello

15. Anne-Marie

16. Becky G

17. Beyoncé

18. Demi Lovato

19. Miley Cyrus

20. Adele

The 20 most-streamed female artists in the US:

1. Ariana Grande

2. Billie Eilish

3. Halsey

4. Cardi B

5. Taylor Swift

6. Nicki MInaj

7. Lady Gaga

8. Rihanna

9. Kehlani

10. Camila Cabello

11. Dua Lipa

12. Selena Gomez

13. Bebe Rexha

14. Beyonce

15. Ella Mai

16. Demi Lovato

17. SZA

18. Julia Michaels

19. Sia

20. Lana Del Rey

Read: Up Next: Rombai Is Ushering In The Return Of Latin Pop Bands

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