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Actress Dayanara Torres Encourages Fans To Seek A Doctor’s Opinion When Something “Feels Funny” After Learning She Has Cancer

On Monday, former Miss Universe Dayanara Torres announced that she is battling skin cancer.

The Puerto Rican beauty queen shared the troubling news with fans in an Instagram post.

“Today I have some sad news… I have been diagnosed with skin cancer ‘melanoma’ from a big spot/mole I never paid attention to, even though it was new, it had been growing for years & had an uneven surface,” Torres, 44, said.

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Soy #Guerrera As mothers we are always taking care of everyone around us… our kids, family, friends & often we forget to take care of ourselves. ???? Today I have some sad news… I have been diagnosed with skin cancer "melanoma" from a big spot/mole I never paid attention to, even though it was new, it had been growing for years & had an uneven surface. ???? My fiancĂ© Louis had been begging me to have it checked & finally made an appointment himself… after a biopsy & a second surgery last Tuesday the results unfortunately are positive. Now we are waiting to see which treatment I will be receiving but they have already removed a big area from the back of my knee & also they have removed 2 lymph nodes at the top of my leg where it had already spread. Hoping it has not spread to any more areas or organs. ???????? ???? I have put everything in God's hands & I know he has all control… My sons although a bit scared know about my faith and know they have a warrior of a mommy! ???? But if I can help anyone along the way based on my experience, it would be to tell you… PLEASE, never forget to take care of yourself. If you see something or feel something different in your body have it checked… I had no idea skin cancer could spread anywhere else in your body. . #Guerrera #iHaveFaith #TrustGod "God doesn't give the hardest battles to his tougher soldier, he creates the toughest soldiers through Life's hardest battles". TODAY is #WorldCancerDay #RaisingAwareness

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She noted that her fiance, Marvel Studios’ co-president Louis D’Esposito, “had been begging me to have it checked & finally made an appointment himself” for a doctor to examine it.

The actress, who won the crown in the Miss Universe pageant in 1993, has since undergone two surgeries that tested positive for skin cancer and is currently waiting to learn what treatment is available for her.

Torres has two children with ex-husband Marc Anthony and disclosed that the young men, Cristian, 18, and Ryan, 15, are “a bit scared” but know “they have a warrior of a mommy!”

She took the moment to stress the need for mothers to listen to their bodies and make the time for their own health.

“As mothers we are always taking care of everyone around us… our kids, family, friends & often we forget to take care of ourselves,” she said. “… PLEASE, never forget to take care of yourself. If you see something or feel something different in your body have it checked.”

Read: ColourPop Cosmetics Gave A Latina Cancer Patient Her Own Makeup Line

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When My Father Started To Die, Teaching His Hermanas and Me How To Make Tamales Was His Way Of Saying Goodbye

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When My Father Started To Die, Teaching His Hermanas and Me How To Make Tamales Was His Way Of Saying Goodbye

Food has always had a significant place in my family’s traditions. It was the center of every gathering and what connected us despite whatever differences we had. Whether it was a BBQ celebrating a birthday or trays of Mexican food at a quiñceanera, food was the common denominator. No event combined food, family, and tradition better than our tamaladas.

My dad was the host of our tamaladas.

Photo provided by Samantha Chavarria

Truthfully, he was the orchestrator of most of our family meals. Someone who had already been cooking for other people all his life, my father put himself through culinary school while my sister and I were small. Working two to three jobs while going to school, he was a man fully committed to making a better life for us. Ever the doting Latino son, family was everything to my dad. As such, he also helped provide for his parents and younger siblings on top of caring for his young family.

His investment paid off and he was eventually able to become an executive chef. However, food wasn’t just my dad’s profession. It was his passion. Even when he retired, he was still the head chef of every holiday meal and family gathering. He even cooked at my wedding; baking and decorating my cake as well as preparing an asado to feed our guests. Food was his gift. His recipes were forged by his senses.

His dishes were the highlight of these life moments. They had the power to bring his family together and that was a responsibility he held in the highest regard.

Then he received his cancer diagnosis.

My dad had been sick for a while but the cause was a mystery. Still, even before doctors could pinpoint the cause for his waning health, my dad was certain it was cancer. My family didn’t want to believe it. I didn’t want to believe it. My dad was clearly just thinking negatively. A man as strong as my dad— a man whose personality was always larger than life— couldn’t be that sick. Doctors hadn’t found anything for a reason. We couldn’t allow it to be a possibility.

Soon we learned it wasn’t just a possibility, it was our reality. My dad was finally diagnosed with pancreatic cancer; a cancer with an only a 7% survival rate past 5 years.

It didn’t seem real. Personally, I rotated through a phase of straight out denial and painful grief. There was no reconciling it in my mind. My dad handled it much better. Even knowing the survival rates, he wasn’t willing to give up without a fight. He wanted to live and, more than anything, he knew his family needed him.

Still, he knew he was on borrowed time. His diagnosis came right before the holidays so he was deep into his first round of chemotherapy by the time Thanksgiving arrived. My dad still made all of his signature dishes, though the occasion felt strained. There was a certain realization that we were trying desperately to ignore. These holiday meals were my dad’s domain and the thought of this holiday season possibly being his final one was overwhelming.

Halfway through December, my dad decided to have a tamalada.

Photo provided by Samantha Chavarria

Some of my aunts and cousins had wanted to learn his recipe for tamales but this could only be learned by making them alongside him. There was no recipe. The consistency of the masa was the guide. It was measured by the scorched fragrance of the ancho chilis. There were no written directions that could properly explain how to spread and roll the cornhusk hojas.

So, in the house owned by my family since my grandfather’s father first purchased it, we held our tamalada.

I knew what my dad was doing. Watching him instruct his sisters in mixing masa and setting my younger cousin to single-handedly prepare multitudes of pan de polvo, I understood his intent. He was passing the knowledge on to those who would be around to use it the following years.

Anger was added to my mixture of grief and denial. I didn’t want this. These secrets were his and, as long as they stayed his, he’d have to stay here to pass them on another day. Sharing them with others felt like he was acknowledging that he wouldn’t be around; that there was a time limit that he was tied to. I didn’t want to admit that.

I had long ago learned these techniques from him. Years of making tamales alongside my dad as we talked and laughed had taught me.

Still, I wish I had paid more attention to his fast folding fingers. I wish I had been more present on the day of the tamalada instead of trying to swallow the bitter combination of my feelings.

My dad died in August of 2018. It devastated my family. I’m honestly surprised to be as functional as I am so soon after his death but I’m still utterly wounded by the loss. My dad was my best friend. He was my teacher. He was the keeper of my secrets, our family history and the recipes that filled our bellies during times both tragic and triumphant.

It hurts, but I finally see that last tamalada for what it was. Yes, it was an attempt to pass those techniques down to their new keepers, but it was something even more significant. It was my father’s attempt to give us final, beautiful memories that would keep us warmly wrapped in his love throughout the coming years. When we wouldn’t have him any longer, we’d have his memories.

When I look back at that last tamalada— past my anger, grief and denial— what I see is truly priceless.

Photo provided by Samantha Chavarria

I see my dad, watching his family create something that would live beyond him. I see him sitting, arms crossed with a tired yet satisfied smile on his face. In my memory, he’s smiling at me; his grin silently telling me, “Mija, it’s going to be okay.”

This year, we will gather in that same house that my great-grandfather bought. In the house my father spent his first and final days in, we will cook the chilis and mix the masa. We’ll shimmer the pork and roll the hojas. My family and I will tell stories about my dad as the tamales cook. We’ll laugh and cry and drink too much cafĂ© con leche in my dad’s honor.

It’s never going to be the same, but it’ll be okay. My dad taught me that, too.


Read: My Abuela’s Distaste For Cooking Taught Me To Appreciate The History And Taste Of A Good Mole

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ColourPop Cosmetics Gave A Latina Cancer Patient Her Own Makeup Line

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ColourPop Cosmetics Gave A Latina Cancer Patient Her Own Makeup Line

Beauty blogger favorite, ColourPop Cosmetics is well known amongst its dedicated batch of followers for its vibrant colors and creative collaborations. The brand, which launched in 2014, also quickly amassed a loyal fanbase because of its wallet-friendly and nonanimal tested products. Today beauty brand boasts a 6.3 million following on Instagram and its products can be found on the shelves of major box stores like Sephora and Ulta. Blowing us away even further, when it comes to the success, is the makeup’s newest partnership with Make A Wish Foundation designed to grant  Delilah Juarez, a childhood cancer patient’s wish.

Delilah Juarez is a 17-year-old cancer patient who inspired a partnership with ColourPop Cosmetics.

After being diagnosed with osteosarcoma— a form of malignant bone cancer— Juarez began to take comfort in applying her own makeup during her cancer treatments. It was a type of escape from her illness that inspired a vision to craft a makeup line that would benefit other cancer patients. Juarez’s hope was that other patients could find an outlet through makeup, a product which can be therapeutic, empowering, and effective in building a person’s self-esteem and morale.

In an effort to bring Juarez’s ambitions to life,  the Nevada chapter of the Make A Wish Foundation contacted the California cosmetics company and inspired the experts at ColourPop to help guide Juarez in developing her own line.

On October 11th Colourpop launched Delilah X ColourPop Collection, a line that made sure to involve Juarez in every aspect of the collaboration.

Inspired by her journey with cancer, the line features names like ‘Cherish,’ ‘Warrior’ and ‘Strength.’ The collection also features some of Juarez’s favorite colors. Navy blue, gold, and versital neutrals make up the Delilah X ColourPop collection color scheme. 

The moving collaboration hasn’t just affected Juarez, who finished her cancer treatments in July, though. With 20% of its sales going to the Make A Wish Foundation, the collaboration will raise money to fulfill even more cancer patients.

This collection has the potential to impact a lot of lives. Each year, over 27,000 children are diagnosed with a condition that qualifies them for wish fulfillment. While the Make A Wish Foundation tries to cover as many as possible, it can only grant about 15,000 wishes annually.

Clearly, with it benefiting a great cause, you can spoil yourself with beautiful makeup and feel good about your purchase. The Delilah X Colourpop Collection is available now through January 11, 2019.

Check out this video about Delilah’s collaboration below!


Read: It’s Been Four Years Since Mariah Carey Released An Album And Now She’s Proceeding With ‘Caution’

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