credit: E Ortiz / Tatiana Tarot / The Hood Witch / La Loba Loca

Fierce Boss Ladies

These Brujas Will Turn Your Instagram Feed Into A Space For Healing And Spiritual Guidance

12/04/17 Raquel Reichard

Most Latinas were raised to quiver at just the mention of the word brujería. Many of us were taught that it was evil, a wild, crazy and ungodly practice that ensured our entry into the fiery gates of hell. But as the modern Latina embraces intersectional feminism, and its ideas of self-love and decolonization, many have found a heroine in the bruja foremother whose traditions were demonized because they could not be controlled.

Finding power and strength in natural healing, spiritual wellness and ancestral knowledge, a growing number of Latinas are reclaiming brujería and creating spaces online for education, health-giving and straight magia. Culture makers like Princess Nokia and Nitty Scott incorporate it into their music, platforms like La Brujas Club and Bruja Tip support those on their spiritual journeys and shops like Curandera Press and Brooklyn Brujeria sell goodies for the proud bruja.

Whether you’re just curious or are actively seeking mystical empowerment, here are some brujas who can teach you more about magia.

1. Tatianna Tarot

🌴 B•L•O•O•M•I•N•G 🌴 📿: @peaceimagesjewelry 📷Magick: @bynikkig #evolution

A post shared by Explorations in Consciousness (@tatiannatarot) on

Tatianna Morales, more popularly known as Tatianna Tarot, is an intuitive tarot specialist, medium and ritual practitioner who uses her Instagram feed to share readings, inspiring messages and fun witchy memes. The New Orleans-based puertorriqueña’s approach to divination is highly accessible, and she has curated a profile that is as impassioned and encouraging as it is vibrant and beautiful.

2. La Loba Loca

Feliz dia de las brujas! To all the femme + womxn that stay loving the earth, soil, water, air, non-human-beings, their communities and themselves fiercely. I am a flower bush in between elder and bladderpod flowers 🌺 thankful for all the resilient and rebellious spirits of muxer and femme brujas ancestors burned on the stake, killed by the heteropatriarchy, silenced by the church… we can never burn because we are 🔥! I got a 15% off my online store lalobaloca.bigcartel.com code:bruja + today is the last day to register for RADICALLY AND CONSCIOUSLY MENSTRUATING ONLINE COURSE (link in bio) + if you want extra perks and support this flower elf become my $$ supporter at Patreon.com/lalobaloca 👽 If you party today, don't forget to soltar un aullido or pour some water to the earth for all the so-called brujas, the hxstorians, the gardeners, the seed keepers, the midwives, the gaslighted bitches, the survivors that speak up and are not believed, the survivors that do magic w/o disclosing their experiences, the medicine makers, the mothers being nurse and doctor, the soil workers, the curanderas, the disposed, the care takers… all our ancestors whose magic organized religion, cisheteropatriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism tried to destroy and didn't. I sent this photo to my mom, tias, primas y abuelas today because it has been all their femme magic and labor that got me here. It has always been femme labor and brujeria feminista that makes this world go around. ALWAYS. #medicinafeminista #brujeríafeminista

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La Loba Loca is a queer yerbetera, seed-saver and doula. The Los Angeles-based peruna often shares tips on herbalism, plant relations, social justice, healing justice and autonomous health. Loba also provides positive messages on her Insta, home remedies and promotions for classes, consultations and items like moon pads and bruja feminist gear.

3. The Hood Witch

✨"TheHoodwitch.com is a website/store/blog and community that I had been working on for the last 4 years. It started as a play on words, with roots to a deeper meaning: a reference to the very real "hood witches", healers, curanderas, wise women, priestess, and most importantly my grandmothers. In Black and brown communities brujas were and have been the healers. They are the shoulders to cry on, they could give you a recipe to clear up your colds, bring love into your life, or offer protection. They are the beacons of light for their community and that has always inspired me, knowing that this magic is in my blood. Yesterday, I released my very first recorded interview for @wearemitu as the founder and visionary behind my brand, I've always stayed lowkey, because I wanted to be known for providing tools and not my appearance. In fact, most people have come to only know me for my signature stiletto nails & hand tattoos. I felt it was important more than ever now to show that I am a real person a strong Black & Mexican woman and to put a face to what I've created. The Hoodwitch has been such a source of inspiration for many and this experience has allowed me to explore my understandings deeper of metaphysics, folk medicine, and wellness in ways I never thought possible. I have always believed my purpose in this life was to share, uplift, support, and spread love to the world around me. (Read more below)

A post shared by The Hoodwitch™ (@thehoodwitch) on

True to her motto, The Hood Witch, also known as Bri Luna, offers everyday magic for the modern mystic. The part-Mexican, part-African American serves her nearly 200K followers by blessing them with self-love notes, self-care tips, hilarious bruja memes and a series of items for sale, like crystals, sage, themed tarot decks and books.

4. Chiquita Brujita

☀️ • • • #Bushwick #Bruja #saturday #sunshine #SuchanOchún #BrooklynBrujeria

A post shared by 💫 Chiquita Brujita 💫 (@chiquitabrujita) on

Chiquita Brujita is a Brooklyn-based fortune teller and bruja dancer. The Boricua’s Instagram is a revolutionary, feel-good, spiritual experience, with posts about liberation, dance — particularly the Afro-Puerto Rican bomba — as resistance and love, and her stunning self-made candles.

5. Indijam

Agnes Ito, known on the ‘gram as Indijam, is a spiritual mentor, alchemist and light worker whose Instagram will brighten your newsfeed with positive affirmations and bruja tips. A self-described “recovering undercover over-lover,” the Peruana-Filipina often posts about self-love and self-pleasure as well as protecting the heart while allowing it to love after heartbreak.

6. Ethereal.1

When the test shot you played around with comes out kinda cute #selfportrait

A post shared by E Ortiz (@ethereal.1) on

E Ortiz, or ethereal.1 on social media, is a healer, spiritual adviser, psychic and mental health advocate from Brooklyn, New York. Sprinkled throughout the puertorriqueña’s Instagram are poems and short videos of Ortiz reminding her nearly 70 thousand followers of their worth, power and beauty in the rawest form.

7. Indigemama

Your tools for healing are an extension of your body, to be honored and revered by all. As I move into month 5 of pregnancy, I give thanks to the #rebozo that has been with me for the last 14 years. 🙌🏾 This same woven textile held my children on my back, provided warmth as they slept, supported my nurslings while I breastfed, held my hips + womb throughout all of my stages of womanhood, wiped my tears + mocos, and moved my body through healing, recovery, and over a decade of self care. 💜 Your tools are sacred. This work is sacred. Give thanks, always. 🙏🏾 To learn more about the rebozo as a #healing technology during pregnancy, come to my workshop in Long Beach this month! 👌🏾🔥 Link in bio. Indigemama.com/workshops. . . . . . . . #indigemamaancestralhealing #elrebozo #rebozos #mtm #rebozoforpregnancy #rebozoforbirth #indigemama #ancestralhealing #ancestral #healing #panquetzani #holisticpregnancy #secondtrimester #traditionalbirthattendant #traditionalmidwifery #selfcare #naturalpregnancy #selflove #natural #bodypositive #ancestralwisdom 📸@paco_pepe_tonio 😘

A post shared by Indigemama: Ancestral Healing (@indigemama) on

Panquetzani, known more commonly on the interwebs as Indigemama, is a holistic womb counselor, wellness coach and full spectrum doula who uses her Instagram account to share posts about ancestral healing and learning to trust one’s self. With her work primarily focused on reproductive health and motherhood, the Los Angeles-based folk healer also uses her account to educate followers on Mesoamerican womb care techniques.

READ: Poetry’s Been Called An Outdated Pastime, But These Latinas Are Breathing New Life Into The Art

Let us know the brujas you love to follow in the comments!

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