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Time Magazine Had One Hundred Slots To Fill For Their ‘100 Most Influential People’ Issue And Picked These Seven Latinas

Time magazine revealed its annual “100 Most Influential People” list for 2018 on Thursday celebrating pioneers, artists, icons, and leaders. Of the one hundred slots to fill, the news magazine only managed to recognize seven Latinas this year. Still, we’re beyond pumped to see this year’s most influential Latinas make the cut.

Here’s a look at the Latinas making waves in their industries and arenas.

Emma González’s strength and activism was praised by President Barack Obama.

For Time’s annual list, the 44th president of the United States celebrated and praised Emma González and her fellow students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for the activism that they have displayed in the wake of the February 14 shooting that terrorized their school.

“By bearing witness to carnage, by asking tough questions and demanding real answers, the Parkland students are shaking us out of our complacency. The NRA’s favored candidates are starting to fear they might lose. Law-abiding gun owners are starting to speak out. As these young leaders make common cause with African Americans and Latinos—the disproportionate victims of gun violence—and reach voting age, the possibilities of meaningful change will steadily grow,” the former president wrote in his piece for the magazine.

Carmen Yulín Cruz’s refusal to let her people be ignored put her in the category of leaders.

Dbl #wcw #carmenyulincruz #fucktrump #nastywomenunite #puertorico

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Last September, when Hurricane Maria battered the island of Puerto Rico, Cruz rose up as an unwavering voice who refused to let the disenfranchised citizens of the territory be ignored. In a short essay written by Puerto Rican actor Benicio Del Toro, the Oscar winner hailed Cruz for her uncompromising strength in fighting for the 3.4 million American citizens on the island who were at the time and have been historically ill-treated and ignored by their own country.

“Cruz’s legacy will be marked by her uncompromising refusal to let anyone ignore the lives of those affected by the hurricane. For this we are forever grateful,” Del Toro shared.

Jennifer Lopez is described as an iconic performer and activist by another artist the Bronx.

@jlo is one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2018—and one of our six #TIME100 covers. "As a kid growing up in the Bronx," writes Emmy-nominated actor @kerrywashington, "I used to watch Jennifer Lopez from the wings. Several of us girls would hide in the folds of the curtains at the Boys & Girls Club to watch her perform. We were in awe of our neighborhood role model and phenom. When Jennifer left the Bronx to pursue her dreams, I would rush to finish my homework on Sunday to watch her on In Living Color. She made me believe that you could come from where we came from and achieve whatever you imagine is possible." Lopez became the first Latina actor to earn over $1 million for a film and the first woman to have a No. 1 album and a No. 1 movie in the same week. Adds Washington: "But she’s also a mother, an entrepreneur, an activist, a designer, a beauty icon, a philanthropist and a producer. She is an undeniable force and a powerful example—not just for women of color but for anyone who has been made to feel 'other' and for everyone who carries the burden and the privilege of being a first." See the full list at TIME.com/100. Photograph by Peter Hapak for TIME

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As “Scandal” actress Kerry Washington explains in the piece she penned about Jennifer Lopez, the singer has been inspiring Washington long before she reached fame as Selena. In her article, Washington described what it was like to be a kid growing up in the Bronx alongside Lopez. “I used to watch Jennifer Lopez from the wings. Several of us girls would hide in the folds of the curtains at the Boys & Girls Club to watch her perform. We were in awe of our neighborhood role model and phenom. When Jennifer left the Bronx to pursue her dreams, I would rush to finish my homework on Sunday to watch her on In Living Color. She made me believe that you could come from where we came from and achieve whatever you imagine is possible,” Washington said before speaking about Lopez’s accomplishment of becoming the “first Latina actor to earn over $1 million for a film and the first woman to have a No. 1 album and a No. 1 movie in the same week.”

Washington’s essay went on to celebrate Lopez for all the many roads that she has paved for the female artists of color that have followed her saying “She’s also a mother, an entrepreneur, an activist, a designer, a beauty icon, a philanthropist and a producer. She is an undeniable force and a powerful example—not just for women of color but for anyone who has been made to feel ‘other’ and for everyone who carries the burden and the privilege of being a first.”

Unconventional artist Cardi was honored for her ability to be outspoken.

I do ,what i like i do i do !! Wearing custom @laureldewitt

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Golden Globe-winning actress Taraji P. Henson described in her article the awe and satisfaction she has felt at seeing Cardi B’s rise in relationship to her own career success. “When I first came up, people said, “She’s too edgy.” But I can do Shakespeare in the Park! You can’t judge me based on where I come from or the colloquialisms that I speak with because that’s who I am.” Henson wrote. “I identify with Cardi B, because she knows that too. The first time I went on her Instagram page, she was so raw, coming at you, like, whoa! She used words like “shmoney” and “shmoves,” and she talked openly about being a former stripper. And she was proud of it—like, So what, I was on the pole, look what I parlayed that into?”

An advocate spoke to the importance of Cristina Jiménez’s work for Dreamers.

In her essay for the Time’s, Selena Gomez wrote about the importance of seeing a Latina activist like Cristina Jiménez become the American dream. “She dreams big. She dreams because she wants there to be a future for the roughly 700,000 young people who, by no choice of their own, were brought to the U.S. as children by their undocumented immigrant parents. She dreams because she wants the fear and anxiety of the unknown to end. She dreams because she is one of the Dreamers who could be affected by the reversal of DACA.” Gomez explained. “As a nation of immigrants, the country is filled with those who believe in the American Dream: the ideal that everyone should have an equal opportunity to achieve success and prosperity through hard work and determination.”

A president shared her love for actress Daniela Vega.

Chile’s former president, Michelle Bachelet recalled the importance of seeing “A Fantastic Woman” actress make history by being the first openly transgender person to present at the Academy Awards for her country. “The movie shows the challenges we face not only as a country but also as human beings—that is, to accept and confront the reality of transgender people in our societies. It’s urgent, and a matter of human rights,” Bachelet explained. “When Daniela made history as the first openly transgender person to present at the Academy Awards, she said this onstage: ‘I want to invite you to open your heart and your feelings, to feel the reality, to feel love.’ I also want to invite people to empathize with others and respect them, because diversity allows us to understand humanity even more”


Read: How Burlesque Helped This Body Positive Latina Get Political

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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

There’s no denying that the world looks a lot different now than it did in 1947. And while the list of all of the positive changes that the decades stretching between now and then have done for the world and minorities, a recent campaign is also highlighting the ways in which our current president could take some notes on certain values the United States held dear during this time. Particularly ones that had been pressed for by one of our former presidents.

As part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Good Neighbor Policy” effort, he worked to promote positive and healthy relations between the United States in Latin American countries.

At the time Rooseveltaimed to ensure that the North, Central and South American countries avoided breaking under the influence of Axis countries during World War II. As part of this campaign, Roosevelt comissioned a Spanish and a Portuguese version of the U.S. national anthem. According to Time Magazine he also “recruited Hollywood to participate in this Good Neighbor Policy; Walt Disney went on goodwill tour of South America, hoping to find a new market for his films, and ended up producing two movies inspired by the trip: Saludos Amigos (1942) and The Three Caballeros (1944). The Brazilian star Carmen Miranda also got a boost, and her role in The Gang’s All Here made her even more famous in the U.S. And alongside these cross-cultural exchanges, the U.S. government decided it needed an anthem that could reach Spanish speakers.”

According to NPR, Clotilde Arias, wrote wrote the translation at the end of World War II, was born in the small Peruvian city, Iquitos in 1901 and moved to New York City to become a composer when she was 22-years-old. Her version of the anthem is now part of an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Now in an effort to support Latino communities affected by the coronavirus, the non-profit We Are All Human Foundation’s Hispanic Star campaign commissioned the a remake of the song.

Hoping to raise awareness of its Hispanic Recovery Plan and efforts to help to connect Hispanic small businesses and workers with resources during the pandemic, the campaign brought the old recording from obscurity.

For the song, the 2019 winner of the singing competition La Voz,  Jeidimar Rijos, performed “El Pendón Estrellado.” Or, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” 

The song has already received quite a bit of comments and support on Youtube.

Hang in there, fam. We can only get through this together.

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A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Detained By Border Patrol On Her Way To School

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A 9-Year-Old Girl Was Detained By Border Patrol On Her Way To School

A 9-year-old U.S. citizen was separated from her mother for 36 hours after agents at the border accused her of lying about her citizenship.

Like thousands of students in our country, Julia Isabel Amparo Medina’s daily commute requires her to cross the U.S. border.

The fourth-grade student attends Nicoloff Elementary School in San Ysidro, California and was in a carpool to school from her home in Tijuana when she ran into traffic. Medina, was commuting to school in a car driven by her mother’s friend Michelle Cardena, Cardena’s two children and her own older 14-year-old brother, Oscar. When the long line to get into the U.S. seemed to be jampacked upon their 4 a.m arrival, Cardenas instructed the kids in her car to walk to the border. She assured them that when they reached it, she would call them an Uber to get them the rest of the way to their school.

But Medina and her never made it across the border or to school that day.

According to the New York Times who talked to a Customs and Border Protection spokesman, two Amparo and her brother arrived at one of the San Ysidro port of entry facilities for pedestrians at 10:15 a.m. last Monday.

Upon their arrival, Amparo and her brother presented their U.S. passports to a CBP officer who soon accused her of being someone else. Note: Amparo’s passport image which was taken years before so she did not look exactly like herself. They also accused her brother of smuggling.

A CBP spokesperson has said that Amparo “provided inconsistent information during her inspection, and CBP officers took the 9-year-old into custody to perform due diligence in confirming her identity and citizenship.”

After CBP officers the confirmed that her brother was a U.S. citizen, he was permitted to enter the U.S while his sister stayed behind. It wasn’t until 6:30 pm on Tuesday, that Amparo was confirmed to be a U.S. citizen as well and was released and admitted to the U.S. to her mother.

Speaking to NBC7, Amparo said she was “scared” of her detention and that she was “sad because I didn’t have my mom or my brother. I was completely by myself.”

According to Amparo’s mother Thelma Galaxia, her daughter claims that she was told by an officer that she and her brother would be released if she admitted to being her cousin. Galaxia claims that officers also convinced her son Oscar to sign a document that Amparo was his cousin and not his sister.

When Galaxia was alerted that her children had been detained she contacted the Mexican consulate.

After being notified by the consulate that her daughter would be released at the San Ysidro Port of Entry. While the family felt relieved to be grateful to be reunited with their daughter, Galaxia says the separation should never have happened.

Over the weekend, Twitter was swift to express their outrage over the incident.

Some even expressed their dismay of having a similar situation happen to them.

Many are using the incident as an example of the racial issues plaguing so many U.S. citizens like Amparo.

So many of the comments included outside opinions from those who have yet to experience the direct targetting of ICE.

Over all, nearly everyone was quick to point out the saddest aspect of Amparo’s experience.

Read: Preschool Students Are Doing Active Shooter Drills And I Guess This Is The New Normal Now

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