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Latinas Are One Of The Fastest Growing Demographics According To This Study And We’re Also Becoming Businesswomen

A recent study conducted by HOPE has found that Latinas are driving economic growth in California – and the nation as a whole. HOPE surveyed Latinas to find out a little bit about who they are and what they are doing for work. This, coupled with the growing demographic of Latinas in the U.S., has shown that Latinas will soon be a large demographic worth paying attention to.

According to the survey, there are 27.9 million Latinas living in the U.S., or about 8.7 percent of the total U.S. population.

CREDIT: latinas.org

In California, Latinas make up 19.2 percent of the total state’s population. Not only are Latinas a fast growing demographic, expected to represent 1 in 4 women by 2060, they are also on average 17.8 years younger than white women. The study also found that more Latinas have access to an education growing by 6.9 percent to a total of 88.3 percent furthermore securing more financially stable futures.

But, the biggest news from the survey is that the number of Latina-owned businesses in California has increased by 111 percent since 2007.

CREDIT: SelenaVEVO / YouTube

“We want to see Latina business owners get the support, the contracts, the capital,” HOPE executive director Helen Torres told LAWeekly. “If they have access to those, we see them growing their businesses and hiring more people.”

According to the study, there were 433,300 Latina-owned business in existence in 2016 in California alone.

Unfortunately, the increase in Latina-owned business and the growing Latina population has not translated into decreasing the wage gap.

Ain’t Your Mama / Nuyorican Records

In fact, the study found that the wage gap has gotten worse for Latinas.

“The wage gap between Latinas and white, non-Hispanic men in California grew by nearly 5 percent between 2011 and 2015. Latinas earned less than 43 cents for every dollar earned by white, non-Hispanic men, lower than the 45 cents they earned in 2011,” the study states. “Latinas in the San Jose and Los Angeles metropolitan regions fared even worse, earning only 35.5 and 37.5 cents, respectively, for every dollar earned by a white man.”

Check out the full study here.


READ: This Is How This Mexican Mom From Oaxaca Is Running Successful Mole And Michelada Businesses

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This Latina Broke The Marathon World Record At Just 16 Years Old And We’re Starting To Think She’s A Super-Human

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This Latina Broke The Marathon World Record At Just 16 Years Old And We’re Starting To Think She’s A Super-Human

At 12, Blanca Ramirez broke a global marathon record. At 16, she’s running to top her only competition: herself.

In 2015, The La Puenta, Calif.-based teen became the youngest female runner to complete seven marathons in seven different continents, running in Rwanda, New Zealand, Paraguay, China, France and Antarctica.

Her interest in international marathons started when she was 10 years old. She had just completed a long-distance running race in Disneyland and was hungry for more. She told her dad she wanted to beat the world record, but he thought she was joking at first.

“It seemed like it was something impossible,” her father Dimas Ramirez told NBC News. “I told her to prove to me she could run a marathon. She ran a 5K, then a 10K and-a-half marathon and then I let her do the Los Angeles Marathon.”

After proving to her dad that she’s fully capable of running around the world, and beating records while she’s at it, the Mexican-American teen is doing it once more — this time with the accompaniment of her younger brother.

Jordan, 9, completed his first marathon in Australia at age 8. He then ran in Egypt, crossed Europe off his list when he did 26.2 miles in London and then took to Thailand. Now, he and his big sis are headed to Antarctica and then South America. He plans to finish off in the US next April.

For Blanca, who has already accomplished the task her brother faces, joining him has been a way to show support and have some fun competition.

“At the end, we try to have a competition of who can cross the finish line first, even though we’re standing next to each other,” she told KTLA 5. “So we can be still next to each other, but I’ll make sure my foot passes it first.”

As for their dad, he’s proud of both of his children meeting their goals — but he’s also looking forward to it for reasons of his own.

“Dad’s very exhausted and I need a break,” he said. “Or they need to pick another sport.”

Read: This Indigenous Woman From Mexico Ran An Ultramarathon In Huaraches Sandals And Won Big

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Study: While Whites Are Responsible For Most Air Pollution, Latinxs And Blacks Are The Most Negatively Impacted

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Study: While Whites Are Responsible For Most Air Pollution, Latinxs And Blacks Are The Most Negatively Impacted

At this point, it’s common knowledge that people of color are more likely to be exposed to pollution than non-Latinx white folk, but a new study is exposing a different aspect of environmental racism.  

According to research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) this month, Black and Latinx people disproportionately breathe the air that is largely polluted by non-Hispanic white people. In simpler terms, white folk are most responsible for adding harmful toxins in our air and people of color, in addition to our planet, are disproportionately paying the price.

The study, led by engineering professor Jason Hill at the University of Minnesota, looked beyond where communities of color live, which tend to be industrialized areas that have high volumes of pollution, and examined consumer demand for products that cause pollution and the quality of air the different racial groups inhale.

Researchers found that white people more often consume products that pollute the air, but Black and Latinx folk are more likely to breathe in the toxins. The study, using data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, found that Latinxs fared off the worse. In fact, according to the analysis, Latinxs inhale 63 percent more air pollution than they cause, while Blacks breathe in 56 percent more air contamination than they are responsible for. In contrast, white people draw in 17 percent less air pollution than they cause.

Anjum Hajat, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington who was not involved in the study, called the inequity unfair.

“If you’re contributing less to the problem, why do you have to suffer more from it,” he told NPR.

Christopher Tessum, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington who participated in the six-year study, told the news outlet that this gap in consumption wasn’t driven by a difference in the goods and services white people and people of color consume but rather by the amount each group utilizes these products and services.

With higher consumption of polluted air, people of color also face increased risk of environment-related health consequences, like cardiovascular problems, respiratory illness, diabetes and even birth defects.

The authors say more research is needed to fully understand the differences and the ways in which to tackle the disparities, from making economic activity and consumption less polluting to rethinking how we build our cities and transportation.

(h/t The Root)

Read: Here’s How You Can Easily Be More Green And Save Big

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