identities

Every Year For Nochebuena, My Twin Brother Gets To Go Golfing While I’m Forced To Play Cinderella And Help Make The Lechon, Here’s Why

There’s a moment in almost every woman’s life when she realizes that the cards are systematically stacked against her because of sexism. The realization hits us at different moments, but it hits hard. For some, it’s the first time we see the unfairness of being scolded for climbing trees or getting in trouble for strict dress codes. For others, its when they get their first pay check or have a male-coworker call them something like “sweetie” or “hun.”

I clued into this reality back when I was a kid watching TV on the couch with my twin brother (aka my same aged brother who had no reason for being treated any differently than me). My mother had been in the kitchen when she called me over to clean up. It wasn’t the first time she’d asked for my help with cleaning, but it was the first time I realized I was the only one asked, and that it was total caca that my twin hadn’t been asked as well.

Lifehacker.com / Giphy.com

Of course, I knew better than to make a fuss about being asked to clean. Mama didn’t raise no dummy who talks back. However, I did open my mouth to say something like “But what about my bother?” which was quickly met with “Boys don’t clean the kitchen.”

And thus began my understanding of the subtle yet very obvious ways he and I were treated differently growing up.

While I hightailed my ass home to make sure I met my 10 o’clock curfew…

Reddit.com / Giphy.com

My twin brother was strolling into the house hours later at midnight.

Jake / Giphy.com

Nearly every one of my outfits went under daily scrutinization…

wifflegif.com / Giphy.com

But my twin bro got away with any size shorts, no problem.

Threadless.com / Giphy.com

My parents wouldn’t let me have a boyfriend.

Remezcla / Giphy.com

Or, drive in cars with my friends.

Disney / Giphy.com

Meanwhile…

ABC / Giphy.com

And despite all of my very ~mature~ and completely logical protests, it continues to this day.

HuffPost / Giphy.com

And we’re both adults!

Even now, when we visit home for Nochebuena, while I’m playing Cinderella in the kitchen with my sister and mother…

Rexpie / Imgur / Giphy.com

My brother’s out hitting balls on the golf green with my dad.

And AFTER dinner? When I’m stuck Jenga-style organizing the fridge with leftovers of lechón and frijoles…

GH-05 / Giphy.com

The prince gets to layback and rest his precious tummy.

Reactiongifs.com. / Giphy.com

Because, you know, he put it in a whole lot of work eating at the dinner table.

Ok sometimes he has to take care of the trash.

Mellisa Deckert / Giphy.com

LBR, that’s the bare minimum.

When I put up a fight about cooking and cleaning, my mom starts sweating me about whether I’ll ever convince some guy to marry me.

TLC / Giphy.com

Or, when I want to go out with my friends? It’s like facing a parole board.

Youtube.com / Giphy.com

My brother could go for a run and literally be gone for hours. Last year, I went running and after being gone 30 minutes my dad rounded up neighborhood watch.

Fox Broadcasting / Giphy.com

Being a twin, I know that I’ve got quite a leg up over the singletons of the world. And all the perks he gets aside, my wombmate is actually pretty much the best.

I was born with a lifelong buddy and have always had someone to help me tackle life’s hurdles. It also means I’m one step closer to being an Olsen twin than anyone who doesn’t have a twin. (Which means I’m basically an Olsen twin?)

weheartit.com / Giphy.com

That is to say, I’m lucky and I know it.

But when it’s all said and done, as a woman, I know there’s a whole lot of BS I’m expected to put up with, and benevolent sexism in my household is absolutely one of them.

So, ICYMI he absolutely should be the one to clean the dishes this year for Thanksgiving, Mom and Dad.


Read: The BS Reasons Why You’re A Latina Getting Payed Less Than Men And Other Women

What kind of caca sexism do you experience in your house? Tell us in the comments below, and recommend this post to your friends!

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

When Emma Gonzalez Leads The March For Our Lives, She’ll Be Following In The Footsteps Of These Latina Civil Rights Leaders

fierce

When Emma Gonzalez Leads The March For Our Lives, She’ll Be Following In The Footsteps Of These Latina Civil Rights Leaders

As you gear up and rally to march for our lives this weekend, you might be completely in awe of the power and effect of Emma Gonzalez. The high school student from Parkland, Fl has, along with the great efforts of her peers, rallied cities and communities across the globe to fight back against the NRA and the inaction of political leaders who have long held the power to put an end to gun violence. For many of us, it’s exciting to see a Latina show the world that once again we are forces to be reckoned with. But long before Gonzalez called B.S. and became the face of a growing national movement, other Latina activists had a huge hand in changing the course of our history.

Here’s a look at seven of some of history’s most powerful Latina activists who led marches and fought for your civil rights.

Sylvia Mendez

the.daily.feminist / Instagram

When it comes to the desegregation of schools in the country, American history often credits the case of Brown v. Board of Education for the changes. Barbara Rose Johns is also the one who is most typically considered to be the face of that movement after she led a 450-student walkout at a high school in Virginia in 1951.

But history has largely written out the work of Sylvia Mendez an American civil rights activists of Mexican and Puerto Rican descent who played a key role in the integration movement back in 1946.

nhmc_org / Instagram

Mendez v. Westminster was a case sparked by Mendez’s rejection from an all-white school in California back in 1943 when she was just eight years old. Mendez’s parents sued the school district and the landmark case which was ultimately settled in 1947 successfully desegregated public schools  in California making it the first U.S. state to do so.

Dolores Huerta

@thewipinc / Instagram

As a fierce civil rights activist and labor leader, Dolores Huerta became a tireless advocate of the United Farm Workers union. The American-born Latina of Mexican descent originally started out her career as an elementary school teacher. After seeing kids in her class come to school hungry and in need of new shoes, she decided she would help organize their parents.

She started to fight for economic improvements for Latino farm workers and pressed local government organizations to improve barrio conditions.

excellentcoatsonirritatedwomen / Instagram

In 1962, she co-founded the National Farm Workers Association (now known as the United Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee) with César Chávez. Her non-violent strikes and protests led to her 22 arrests. In 1997 she was named one of the three most important women of the year in by Ms. magazine.

Carmen Perez

Noam Galai/WireImage

In 2017, Perez helped lead the country in its largest protest in U.S. history as a co-chair of the Women’s March on Washington.

In her 20 year career as an activist, Perez has dedicated her advocacy to some of today’s most important civil rights issues including violence against women, mass incarceration, gender inequality and community policing.

taiiasmartyoung / Instagram

Before the Women’s March she helped launch a 9-day 250-mile march from New York City to Washington, DC called March2Justice which implored congressional lawmakers to turn their attention to the nation’s police justice crisis.

Berta Cáceres

univisionplaneta / Instagram

Best known for leading a campaign that opposed a dam on the Gualcarque River, Cáceres was an award-winning Indigenous environmental activist. In 2015, the Honduran environmentalist received the Goldman Environmental Prize for helming the grassroots effort that pushed the world’s largest dam builder to stop the construction of the Agua Zarca Dam at the Río Gualcarque.

Because of her efforts the river that was saved and considered to be sacred by the Lenca people, was still able to provide the nearby tribe access to water, food, and medicine.

infonodal / Instagram

On March 3, 2016, Berta Cáceres was assassinated for her activism when two assailants broke into her home and shot her. Her murder sparked international outrage and brought attention to the fact that Honduras is the most dangerous country in the world for activists who fight to protect forests and rivers.

The Mirabal Sisters

lorpop3 / Instagram

Patria, Dedé, Minerva, and María Teresa Mirabal were four sisters from the Dominican Republic who ferociously opposed the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo and became known as Las Mariposas. In 1959, after witnessing a = massacre executed by the Trujillo regime the sisters were sparked into activism and rallied communities into public protests that renounced Trujillo’s rule.

Three of the sisters, Minerva, María Teresa, and Patria, were murdered for their advocacy when they were beaten to death by associates of the government.

historiadeellas / Instagram

Following the death of Las Mariposas, Dominicans across the island decided they had had enough. Six months later, Trujillo’s dictatorship was brought down when he was assassinated.

Sylvia Rivera 

luz_0602 / Instagram

Well before activists like Harvey Milk and figures like Caitlyn Jenner made waves, there was Sylvia Rivera. The Latina born and raised in New York City had Puerto Rican and Venezuelan roots and a tragic story when she first began to carve out a place for trans people in the American gay liberation movement. 

Rivera was a self-identified drag queen and transwoman who participated in the Stonewall riots of 1969 and soon after founded Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries (STAR) with Marsha P. Johnson.

anithacocktail_ / Instagram

In 1970 she led trans activists in the country’s first Gay Pride march, then known as Christopher Street Liberation Day March and in the years after she delivered fervent speeches that called for the support of LGBTQ people of color and who were homeless.


Recommend this story by clicking the share button below!

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A Latina Aide Is Accusing Ohio Representatives Of Making Racist And Sexually Suggestive Remarks

politics

A Latina Aide Is Accusing Ohio Representatives Of Making Racist And Sexually Suggestive Remarks

An Ohio legislative aide is alleging that three state representatives made racist and sexist remarks to her and her colleagues.

On Sunday, Marisa Reyes, a former aide to Republican lawmaker Scott Wiggam, wrote an open letter to Democratic Rep. Kristen Boggs about her one-time boss’s purported behavior.

According to Reyes, who appears to be Columbus-rooted and Mexican American based on her Twitter profile, Wiggam referred to women as irrational.

“During my time as a staffer in this office, I had to endure months of unacceptable treatment and was forced to listen to the Representative’s opinions that painted myself, my family and other Hispanics in a demeaning light,” Reyes wrote in the letter. “When I respectfully disagreed with the Representative about an issue, I was told that ‘women do not think logically, they think with their hearts, not with their brains.’”

The representative allegedly also made comments about her ethnic background, purportedly calling Reyes “the good type of Mexican” after sharing with him her parents’ immigration story.

According to Reyes’ letter, he’s not the only male lawmaker who has slighted female employees.  At a office holiday party, Reyes says Rep. Wes Retherford threatened women staffers and made sexually suggestive remarks.

“He caused a scene by screaming and threatening myself and other female house aides not to discuss events from that night and remarked to me at a different point that he would ‘prefer to see me with my dress off,’” said Reyes.

Reyes posted the open letter on Twitter a day before the House voted on its next speaker. She hoped it would urge Democrats like Boggs to not support Rep. Larry Householder, who the men she claims made the racist and sexist remarks had backed.

“I have suffered degrading comments and harassment by the very people that the Democratic caucus may choose to empower on January 7th, 2019,” she wrote. “I urge you not [to] support a leadership team that promises to solve problems that they themselves are perpetuating.”

Householder, who wasn’t accused of any misconduct by Reyes, was re-elected Ohio House speaker on Monday.

Wiggam has denied the allegations made against him, telling Newsweek in a statement that Reyes’ accusations were politically motivated.

“Although the former leadership team may have known about these allegations, yesterday’s letter was the first time this was brought to my attention. The allegations made against me are absolutely false,” the statement read. “I believe that the allegations were politically motivated and coordinated by the outgoing leadership team. I am seeking House legal counsel and I call for a full investigation to clear my name.”

Reports from Latinas challenging powerful leaders in the workplace have become more prominent. Recently, an undocumented housekeeper at President Trump’s New Jersey golf club spoke out against mistreatment by management and hurt over the big boss’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies in the White House.

Read: Like Every Congressional Freshman, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Is Making Some Beginner’s Mistakes

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below!

Notice any corrections needed? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *