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20 Plantain Recipes You Didn’t Know You Needed

As a Cubana, I grew up eating fried sweet plantains (platanos maduros fritos) with pretty much every meal. I’ve also had plenty of tostones and plantain chips in my life, but I never thought that plantains had more to give than that. I mean, aren’t they just funny shaped bananas? (They’re not). As I learned to cook, however, I discovered that there is a whole world of recipes out there that utilize the humble plantain as a vehicle for many different types of dishes.

Plantains are typically sweet, so you might assume that all of the recipes on this list are going to be sweet too, but that’s just not true. There is plenty that you can do to plantain dishes that actually makes them savory or, in some cases, a mix of sweet and savory. Take, for example, the plantain gnocchi or plantain lasagna. If you’re curious and want to know how to make plantain tortillas for

Taco Tuesday or a plantain-infused brownie (yes, really!), here are 20 plantain recipes you didn’t know you needed. But trust me, you SO need these.

1. Plantain Tortillas

ZenBelly.com

When it’s Taco Tuesday but you want a low-carb version, try these plantain tortillas. They’re delicious AND nutritious, and what else could we possibly ask for?

2. Sweet Plantain Apple Bacon Breakfast Hash

PaleoRunningMomma.com

I’ve never considered plantains to be a breakfast food, but why not? This breakfast hash, that’s also made with apples, is a sweet yet savory treat at the same time.

3. Sweet Plantain Waffles

EasyGFRecipes.com

The sweetness of the plantains are a surprisingly great way to make waffles. All you need is to top them with your favorite other fruit, and trust me when I say that if you want to top them with fried sweet plantains, then that’s okay too. Just don’t forget the maple syrup!

4. Coconut Sugar Caramelized Plantains

MinimalistBaker.com

For a sweet, almost dessert-like treat, caramelized plantains are a great alternative to your usual fried sweet plantain treat. These are topped by whipped cream, which makes them even more special.

5. Plantain Lasagna

NashiFood.com

Did you know that you can make a lasagna with plantains? Yes, you can! This recipe is delicious and actually much easier than you can imagine.

6. Spicy Brazilian Burrito Bowls

PinchOfYum.com

Burritos aren’t usually topped by plantains, but I don’t think there is any reason why you shouldn’t try this recipe. It’s a classic burrito bowl with a Brazilian twist… and that’s just delicious.

7. Sweet Plantain Gnocchi

ASassySpoon.com

Gnocchi, a classic Italian dish, gets a much-needed dose of Latin flavor when you make these pasta pillows with sweet plantains instead of sweet potatoes. It might seem strange at first, but this savory dish is pretty much perfect for a fancy date night dinner.

8. Plantain Buns

TheCuriousCoconut.com

Got buns? These plantains do! You won’t believe what these are like. In fact, I recommend that you make these for your next Thanksgiving table and it’ll be a great time.

9. Plantain Carnitas Nachos

UnboundWellness.com

Nachos are absolutely delicious, and a perfect snack for any time of year. Instead of tortilla chips, you can use plantains for the base… and top them with basically anything you want. Might I suggest carnitas?

10. Plantain Fudge Brownies

HoldTheGrain.com

Yes, plantains are so sweet and incredible that they can even make a great dessert. Who doesn’t love brownies, after all? This recipe is for all of you sweet tooth out there.

11. Turkey Picadillo Stuffed Sweet Plantains

SkinnyTaste.com

You already know that plantains are a great low-carb option for your dinner table, and these stuffed plantains are a great meal. Stuff them with a turkey picadillo for a healthy twist.

12. One-Pot Beans and Plantains

RecipeFromAPantry.com

A one-pot meal is a great way to bring more plantains into your life. It’s a really easy to make this high-protein, low-carb meal. Eat it plain or with a little bit of quinoa for an added dose of protein.

13. Smashed Plantain Pulled Pork Slider

RealSimpleGood.com

Smashed plantains are really easy to make, and you’ll be super grateful when you check out this recipe. A sandwich isn’t just a sandwich when you make it with smashed plantains as the bread base and pulled pork for the inside. Trust me, everyone at work will be jealous AF.

14. Baked Plantain Fries

Tasty-Yummies.com

Plantain fries are a great way to indulge your love of French fries but without all the carbs. These are delicious, nutritious, and really easy to make. Oh, and that avocado side? It’s even better.

15. Three Cheese Plantain Crust Pizza

HealthyNibblesAndBits.com

If you’re really into being Paleo, then you are probably always looking for ways to make your favorite meals into Paleo-friendly versions. This pizza is pretty much the dream embodiment of that, and it’ll be good even if you’re not Paleo. After all, a plantain crust sounds pretty AH-mazing to me.

16. Plantain Bacon Fritters

PaleoRunningMomma.com

You can make fritters out of a lot of things, but you should definitely make them out of plantains first and foremost. These with bacon are especially delicious, and can be good for any time of day.

17. Tropical Buddha Bowls with Plantains

BeyondMereSustenance.com

A Buddha Bowl is a great, healthy dish that usually costs a pretty penny in your local health store. You can recreate one at home, though, with plantains and many other delicious goodies like mangoes and avocados.

18. Single Serve Paleo Breakfast Skillet

PaleoRunningMomma.com

If you’re home along, you might not be sure how to incorporate plantains into your diet because most recipes serve more than just one person. However, this one is perfect for all of the single ladies out there.

19. Stuffed Plantain Cups

SmartLittleCookie.net

Platanos rellenos are a great dish to serve at your next party. They’re simple, bite-size, and really yummy. You can, of course, stuff them with anything but following this recipe exactly doesn’t disappoint.

20. Plantain Cake

DoYouEvenPaleo.com

Another plantain dessert, another day. This cake looks pretty delicious and is perfect for taking to your next gathering. If you’re not sure what else to bring, then just know that this one is a sure people-pleaser.


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Let Us Shed A Tear For The Non-Floridians Who Have Never Experienced Publix

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Let Us Shed A Tear For The Non-Floridians Who Have Never Experienced Publix

Hi, hello, thank you for taking a moment to take a seat at my Ted Talk!

I’d like to take the time we have together today to talk about the wonder that is Publix.

As many of you fortunate enough to live in the Southeast know, Publix is a Florida-based grocery store with all of the class.

@CourtKramer39 / Instagram

They’re a place known for their remarkable customer service and clean aisles. At Publix, shopping is literally a pleasure.

That’s right folks, this is a place of impeccable cleanliness and organization.

@publix / Instagram

At Publix, no corner is left unswept and no aisle left without the item you needed.

And their subs have been bringing people to tears circa 1930.

@SunSentinel / Instagram

If you haven’t had an Italian sub from Publix what what WHAT are you doing?

Guys! This place is so good that schools literally send students there for field trips.

@MeadowfieldElem / Instagram

At Publix there’s so much to learn.

And their employees actually love working there!

And it’s probably because of their amazing benefits and vacation set up.

Recently a wave of Publix enthusiasts went viral for their devotion to the store’s key lime pie.

@pierceall / Instagram

An article by Buzzfeed boasted about the desserts greatness. And they were right.null

But KEY to the Publix experience has been the grocery chain’s dedication to Latino satisfaction.

@pbpost / Instagram

They literally have a STORE that focuses on Latinos called Sabor.

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New vest #publixsabor#nowisgreen#ilikeit ????

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The Southeastern-based store has run a line of Publix Sabor stores for years geared toward Florida’s Cuban, Puerto Rican, and other Latino shoppers. Recently they started to expand its offerings in heavily populated Latino populations with a Publix store called Sabor.

This place is the diggs guys! And they have all kinds of amazing foods to offer.

Like their commitment to the Cubano.

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????????????#winning #publixcuban #yesss

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Which for real will NEVER be good as your mother’s, but will always for real do everything to be top notch.

And their Tres Leches cake which is qualiT

Publix.com


And this is a fact that FOR REAL any Latino in the Southeast knows to be true.

No but for real.

It’s a taste like no other.

And beyond Tres Leche you can count on Publix to STAY stocked on your mama’s favorites.

Literally feels like home at the Publix in Little Havana guys.

And they for real have the hookup.

Yes they do.

Now go forth into the world my people and enjoy your limp meals at Whole Foods and Safeway!


Read: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Calls The Lack Of Black And Latinx Diversity At NYC’s Specialized Schools An “Injustice”

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Up Next: Meet Victoria La Mala, The Mexican Badass Empowering Women With Urban-Banda Jams

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Up Next: Meet Victoria La Mala, The Mexican Badass Empowering Women With Urban-Banda Jams

Up Next is a FIERCE series highlighting rising Latina and Latin American women artists you might not know about but definitely should.

You know what Paquita la del Barrio is to your grandmother or perhaps what Jenni Rivera was to your tía? Well, that’s what Victoria La Mala is for our generation: a singer whose inner power is the only thing more forceful than the strong vocal pipes she uses to remind you that you are that bitch.

Born Victoria Ortiz in Mexico City, the singer-songwriter jumped into the music scene in 2015, bringing a refreshing sound and style to regional Mexican music with all the same girl power of her barrier-breaking female predecessors. Describing herself as the musical offspring of Tupac and Selena, the now Los Angeles-based singer places her soulful vox over traditional banda and ranchera rhythms to deliver treats for your ears and soul. Her songs, like last year’s chart-making “Merezco Mucho Más,” call out male fuckery and empower girls to know their strength, worth and beauty and leave toxic romances behind.

On the block, Victoria, who’s also the first Mexican artist to be signed to Roc Nation Latin, continues to be inspirational. On Monday, the 30-year-old launched her fifth annual #TeamMalaPromGiveaway, a campaign providing low-income teenage girls in Los Angeles with dresses, accessories and makeup and hair tutorials. This year, she will help 50 girls, who must submit their applications before March 29, become the prom princesses she knows they already are.

We chatted with Victoria all about the giveaway, making banda bops for millennials, her anticipated new, and sonically different, music, as well as why she wants to empower women and girls in everything she does, among so much more.

FIERCE: You were born and raised in Mexico but also spent much of your time growing up taking extended trips with relatives in Los Angeles. What genres of music were you listening to here and there, and how do you think this has influenced your pop-urbano-banda style today?

Victoria La Mala: I used to listen to a lot of regional Mexican music in Mexico because of my parents. They love banda and mariachi. I spent a lot of summers in LA, and I had some aunts who listened to hip-hop, ‘90s R&B, and I loved soul. I think all of those styles of music influenced me, and I think you can hear them in me.

FIERCE: Absolutely. While you sing mostly regional Mexican genres, you have a very soulful voice. Talking about your voice, it’s very strong and powerful. No one can deny your vocal talent. When did you realize you could sing and that music was something you wanted to pursue?

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bs12K4snG2x/

Victoria La Mala: I literally cannot remember a time in my life without singing. When I look back on my childhood, I was that one little girl always singing. I loved music. I sang in class and school. But when I was 15, I started getting a little more confidence in myself. I’d be out at parties and people would say, “sing for us.” That’s when I realized this is something I love and have a big passion for. I started singing in a couple bands. I sang at family functions and school functions. So I think when I was around 15 is the time I was like, I love this and I think this is what I want to do.

FIERCE: Why banda? This isn’t exactly a genre that’s expected from young millennial women?

Victoria La Mala: For me, it was always important to represent my culture and tell my story as a woman. Some of the first memories I had listening to live music was banda. My first album in 2013 was full banda. It was just important for me to represent. My dad had passed away a few years before then, and he loved banda. When I moved to the States from Mexico, I wanted to represent from the beginning, and from there I started evolving as an artist as well. I tried different regional sounds and more fusions, because it’s all a part of my story and who I am. I was exposed to more types of music. Being a girl raised in Mexico City, I listened to everything in the streets, Spanish rock, cumbia, so I think it’s important to represent my culture and my story.

FIERCE: I love that and definitely see that. While artists like Paquita la del Barrio and Jenni Rivera made waves for women in traditional Mexican music, these genres continue to be male-dominated. Honestly, most Latin genres do. How has your experience been trying to navigate this industry as a woman, and as one who is very vocal about her opinions on men and proud of her identity.

Victoria La Mala: You know, they always say, “Victoria hates men.” But I don’t, just a couple that have been bad, but some are great. But it’s definitely difficult being a woman, not just in music, in a world that has been male-dominated. The roles of women have slowly been changing: women started working, started going to school and now they’re doing basically anything that we want. But because it hasn’t been many years to do these things, it’s still a struggle. And in music, it’s reflected. Music, I think, reflects what’s happening in society. Now girls are starting to take power in music. Girls want to listen to other girls. They want to feel identified and want our stories told. It’s definitely still difficult. It’s definitely still a struggle, especially on the industry side. There’s this idea that girls dont like girls, girls don’t like to listen to girls. This is also an idea that has been changing, though. I grew up listening to women I love, playing my CDs and singing along to them. I think women nowadays are the same: we want to hear our stories.

FIERCE: I think you’re right. Not only are many of the rising acts in Latin music women, but they are sharing their stories through their music.

Victoria La Mala: Right, exactly. Thank you.

FIERCE: Making a space for yourself where others might be uncomfortable, though, isn’t something you seem to ever shy away from. Another example: you’re the first Mexican artist signed to Roc Nation. How has this been for you?


Victoria La Mala: It has been an amazing experience. I’ve been able to learn so much from people in the industry who have been doing this for years. I’ve met legends, people I looked up to as a little girl, people I still look up to.

FIERCE: Like who?

Victoria La Mala: Like Beyoncé and Rihanna. I got to sing with Paquita la del Barrio. Olga Tañón invited me to sing with her at Premio Lo Nuestro. It’s been an incredible couple of years, learning and growing so much. It’s been really amazing for me. This is part of what I always wanted to do: represent my culture and what I come from as Latinos and Mexicans in a more general-market kind of way. People never really listen to Mexican music, so for them to say, “let me see this Mexican artist signed to Roc Nation,” that’s an amazing experience. As you mentioned before, part of me always feels like I have to fight for what I want. I grew up seeing that. I grew up around strong women that will make a way.

FIERCE: And that’s clear in your music. As I stated earlier, your songs are very bold and empowering. They often validate women’s experiences in relationships and remind them of their own strength, beauty and power. Why?

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Feeling like ???????? @premiolonuestro

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Victoria La Mala: It’s so important for me because I think music literally is the soundtrack to our lives. We have songs we play when we are feeling so sad and want to cry. We have songs we want to play that cause us to feel strong, like you could do whatever you want to do.  I grew up listening to strong women that made me feel powerful, and it’s important for me to give that back to other girls. Sometimes, I play my own songs when I’m going through it, like, “yes, girl!”

FIERCE: Haha! I love that. I can honestly say that “Si Va A Doler Que Duela” was one of the songs that helped get me through my last breakup, so I completely get it.

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Ella no era #Mala….La hicieron ????✨✨

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Victoria La Mala: Thank you. I really appreciate that.

FIERCE: You’re also inspiring outside of your music, though. I know you have a prom dress giveaway each year, where you provide dresses, makeup and accessories to underserved teens so they can attend prom and feel like a princess for an evening. Talk to me about this. Why do this?


Victoria La Mala: To me, this is one of my favorite times of the year. I love being able to connect with young girls. When I was in high school, my dad wasn’t there anymore, and my mom, by herself, had to make sacrifices for my siblings and myself. For my high school graduation, I had to figure out dresses, which was so expensive, and I thought, maybe I should come up with a giveaway for girls doing their prom and can’t afford it. There are so many circumstances as to why they might need help. I started this five years ago. I had people, whoever I knew, give me dresses. I said, “anyone who wants to donate, I will give you a CD.” That’s all I had. People donated dresses, and I think we dressed 10 girls that year. I did it all on my own. I had no clue what I was doing, but it was an amazing experience to see girls have the dress they wanted. I knew I needed to do it again. Here we are now in our fifth year. Last year, we  dressed more than 60 girls. This year, I’m hoping that doubles. Now we also have sponsors.

FIERCE: What do you think is your overall goal with this giveaway?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BuU9O0LHL-H/

Victoria La Mala: My goal is for girls to enjoy their prom. I want them to feel like all their efforts were worth this moment, that all their hard work does pay off. I just want them to be happy that day. I’m also really hoping every year we can double the amount of dresses we give. I also hope that we can take it out of LA. This is my home and community, so this is where I’ve been doing it, but I hope to take it to other cities and one day everywhere.

FIERCE: Love that! I want to get back into music. You haven’t released a new song in a little while, and there’s a lot of anticipation around Victoria La Mala and demand for new music. What do you have in store for this year that you can tell us about?

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Baby it’s cold outside ❄️❄️❄️

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Victoria La Mala: Well, last year, I put out only two songs. One did amazing and was on the charts, “Merezco Mucho Más,” and the other I put out during the end of the summer, “Corazón valiente,” which was for immigrants. But after that, I had a couple changes within my team. I took time for me to get in the studio, work on music, write my stuff, get involved in everything, from production and sound to writing new songs. We are almost there. It’s just been a process. I’ve just been waiting and writing and making sure everything sounds and is how I creatively see it. Again, we’re almost there. I think it’s going to be something new and different from what I put out in the past and reflects who I am, a mix of Mexican culture and me living in New York, LA, Mexico City, more of the urban side. So it’ll be something new and something I’ve been wanting to work on for a while, so I’m excited.

FIERCE: You’re 30 years old, at the earlier stages of your career, what do you hope people can say about Victoria La Mala in 10 to 15 years?

I hope people can say that I’ve helped them feel empowered, that my music has been a big part of their life. I dont think a lot about this. I think about things I want to accomplish more than things people say about me. I hope my music can empower them and be a part of their life and touch them the way other artists have inspired me.

Read: Up Next: Rombai Is Ushering In The Return Of Latin Pop Bands

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