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10 Things You Should Know About Acne and 10 Old Latino Remedies To Try Out

Acne is a problem that many of us deal with beginning from puberty onward. Like many health issues, its causes are numerous and varied, meaning it can be much more complex to fix than we’d like to believe. Although it’s unlikely that you’ll discover a miracle cure that takes care of all your acne woes, knowing what leads to acne in the first place will help you make informed decisions about your approach to skincare. Check out these 10 facts about acne below, and then read up on 10 Latino-inspired remedies that could potentially work wonders for your skin.

Acne happens at any age.

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While acne is often thought of as a problem just for teens, the reality is that it’s common for people of all ages. Sadly, breakouts can still happen well into your 20s, 30s, and 40s.

Diet can affect acne, too.

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They say that you are what you eat, and when it comes to acne, that rule definitely still applies. Some foods, like chocolate and dairy, are rumored to be triggers for acne.

PMSing probably means more pimples.

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As if mood swings, cramps, and bloating aren’t bad enough when it’s that time of the month, acne is also likely to ramp up when you’re PMSing as well. Hormonal shifts during your cycle are the main culprit for menstrual acne.

Washing your face isn’t a surefire way to avoid acne.

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You’d think that taking extra good care of your face — i.e. washing it religiously every day and anytime you’re removing makeup — would essentially guarantee an acne-free life. But acne doesn’t discriminate, and it can strike even if you’re a dedicated face washer.

Makeup can be a culprit.

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Speaking of makeup, as much fun as it is to get dolled up, all of those products can wreak havoc on your skin. Sleeping in makeup is probably the cardinal sin of skin care — it can cause clogged pores, breakouts, and irritation.

Clear skin doesn’t always last forever.

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Your skin is the largest organ on your body. Even when things are going well — and it looks like all is clear — it’s probably only a matter of time before a breakout takes place, simply because your skin makes up such a large part of your body.

Yes, stress is a cause.

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Odds are you’ve heard this hundreds of times before: Stress is not great for your skin. Stress releases the hormone cortisol, which can mess with other hormones and lead to various skin problems like breakouts, irritation, and redness.

Tanning isn’t a solution.

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Wouldn’t it be nice if a sunkissed glow could mask even the nastiest of breakouts? Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way. Even if you’re still rocking that tan from sitting poolside all summer, that won’t stop acne from rearing its ugly head.

Popping pimples isn’t a good idea.

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Although squeezing a zit or blackhead can be incredibly satisfying, it’s not the best way to handle acne. Try to hold off on the popping in order to allow your skin to heal on its time.

Workouts may be worsening your acne.

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Unsurprisingly, sweat rubbing up against your body during a workout can affect the likelihood of a breakout taking place. Taking a shower and changing into fresh clothes ASAP following a sweat session is your best defense against these workout-induced acne problems.

Vick’s VapoRub

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Vick’s VapoRub is basically legendary for Latinos everywhere. It can supposedly cure a whole host of ailments, from achy joints to the common cold. Why not give it a go to help out with any of those pesky acne problems?

Aloe Vera

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Aloe vera contains antibacterial properties that can be beneficial for dealing with breakouts and reducing redness. It also works to keep bacteria from infecting acne hotspots where pimples are most concentrated.

Tequila

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In certain Latino circles, tequila is hailed as a cureall. It’s often suggested as a remedy for fighting off colds and sore throats, but why not see if it can combat acne, too? Hey, it’s worth a shot.

Manzanilla tea

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Otherwise known as chamomile tea, this popular drink might as well double as a magical elixir. Manzanilla has antibacterial effects, meaning it can help out when it comes to treating acne. Mix it with a little honey to create an all-natural moisturizing face mask.

Onions and honey

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It might seem like a strange combination, but onions and honey can create quite the bacteria-fighting duo. They’re both natural disinfectants that can help you deal with bacterial infections on the skin.

Apple cider vinegar

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Like many other vinegars, apple cider vinegar has properties that can ward off bacteria and viruses of all varieties. It may also be particularly helpful for lessening the appearance of acne scars, thanks to the lactic acid found in most vinegars.

Cinnamon and honey

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Yep, honey is making another appearance on the list, proving once again that it’s one of the most versatile all-natural ingredients for fighting acne out there. Combine it with a couple sprinkles of cinnamon — which has several antioxidants — to help reduce inflammation.

Lemon juice

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Lemon juice is widely thought to be a great solution for dealing with acne. It has mild astringent qualities that can get rid of oiliness, and its brightening properties may alleviate redness while decreasing the visibility of acne scars.

Ginger

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Ginger is another natural astringent that can help prevent wrinkles and get rid of acne-causing bacteria. You can make a topical ginger juice by mixing it with a little water. Add — what else? — honey for some moisturizing qualities.

Estafiate

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This herb, commonly found throughout Mexico, is often used to deal with cramps and stomach aches. However, it can also be used to make a salve that soothes burns and bruises.


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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

There’s no denying that the world looks a lot different now than it did in 1947. And while the list of all of the positive changes that the decades stretching between now and then have done for the world and minorities, a recent campaign is also highlighting the ways in which our current president could take some notes on certain values the United States held dear during this time. Particularly ones that had been pressed for by one of our former presidents.

As part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Good Neighbor Policy” effort, he worked to promote positive and healthy relations between the United States in Latin American countries.

At the time Rooseveltaimed to ensure that the North, Central and South American countries avoided breaking under the influence of Axis countries during World War II. As part of this campaign, Roosevelt comissioned a Spanish and a Portuguese version of the U.S. national anthem. According to Time Magazine he also “recruited Hollywood to participate in this Good Neighbor Policy; Walt Disney went on goodwill tour of South America, hoping to find a new market for his films, and ended up producing two movies inspired by the trip: Saludos Amigos (1942) and The Three Caballeros (1944). The Brazilian star Carmen Miranda also got a boost, and her role in The Gang’s All Here made her even more famous in the U.S. And alongside these cross-cultural exchanges, the U.S. government decided it needed an anthem that could reach Spanish speakers.”

According to NPR, Clotilde Arias, wrote wrote the translation at the end of World War II, was born in the small Peruvian city, Iquitos in 1901 and moved to New York City to become a composer when she was 22-years-old. Her version of the anthem is now part of an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Now in an effort to support Latino communities affected by the coronavirus, the non-profit We Are All Human Foundation’s Hispanic Star campaign commissioned the a remake of the song.

Hoping to raise awareness of its Hispanic Recovery Plan and efforts to help to connect Hispanic small businesses and workers with resources during the pandemic, the campaign brought the old recording from obscurity.

For the song, the 2019 winner of the singing competition La Voz,  Jeidimar Rijos, performed “El Pendón Estrellado.” Or, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” 

The song has already received quite a bit of comments and support on Youtube.

Hang in there, fam. We can only get through this together.

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A Group Of Primarily Female Mexican Scientists Discovered A Potential Cure For HPV

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A Group Of Primarily Female Mexican Scientists Discovered A Potential Cure For HPV

“If you’re having sex, you’ll likely contract HPV at some point in your life.” That is how one gynecologist explained the sexually transmitted diseases to me, which completely freaked me out. Even though human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common virus contracted through sexual intercourse, it doesn’t make it less scary when you realize that it’s related to 150 viruses and can lead to cancer for both men and women. While there are vaccines available to prevent the spread of HPV to a broader age group than in previous years, we are finally closer to finding a cure.

A group of primarily female Mexican scientists at the National Polytechnic Institute cured their patients of HPV.

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The team of researchers, led by Dr. Eva Ramos Gallegos (pictured above), treated 420 patients from Veracruz and Oaxaca, and 29 from Mexico City. They used “photodynamic therapy” which “is a treatment that involves using a drug, called a photosensitizer or photosensitizing agent, and a particular type of light to treat different areas of the body” according to their report.

The doctors found extraordinary results through their method of treatment that led to cure 100 percent of the people that had HPV. They also cured 64.3 percent of people infected with HPV that had cancerous cells, and 57.2 percent of people that had cancerous cells without the HPV virus. That last result could mean that a cure for cancer is not far behind.

“Unlike other treatments, it only eliminates damaged cells and does not affect healthy structures. Therefore, it has great potential to decrease the death rate from cervical cancer,” Dr. Gallegos told Radio Guama.

People on social media ecstatically hailed the finding by the Mexicana researchers.

We highly doubt President Trump will ever mention this achievement.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has yet to comment on this remarkable finding.

While there’s more testing that will inevitably take place, we will have to wait and see how long it takes for other researchers and scientists to catch on to their method of treatment.

The fact that a woman-led team discovered this cure is something we should all be applauding.

Hopefully, their research will get more funding so they can further test patients and help educate others about their process.

According to the CDC,  79 million Americans, primarily teens and people in the early 20s, are infected with HPV. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer. The way to prevent contracting HPV is by getting the vaccine — available for males and females — and by using condoms. However, you can still contract HPV because HPV can infect areas not covered by a condom – so condoms may not adequately protect against getting HPV.

READ: Here Are A Handful Of Reasons Why We Need To Talk To Latinx Kids About S-E-X

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