things that matter

The Trump Administration Is Using Religious Values To Block Two Unaccompanied Minors From Getting Abortions

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is battling the Trump administration over abortion rights again. This time, two undocumented teenagers, known as Jane Roe and Jane Poe, have been denied access to an abortion.

In October, a court ruled in favor of Jane Doe, another undocumented teenager who was fighting to get access to an abortion after the Trump administration tried to block her.

According to a release by the ACLU, the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) is the organization denying the young women access to safe abortions. ORR is part of the Department of Human and Health Services, in the office of Administration for Children & Families.

“We’ve already stopped the Trump administration from blocking one young woman’s abortion,” Brigitte Amiri, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project, said in a statement. “But the Trump administration is relentless in its cruelty, blocking abortion access for the most marginalized people in our country. It’s unreal that the federal government is trying to force more young women to continue their pregnancies against their will.”

The Trump administration argued that unaccompanied minors do not have a constitutional right to access abortions while in federal custody.

More specifically, E. Scott Lloyd, the head of the Office of Refugee Resettlement, has had a big part in blocking abortion access to unaccompanied minors in the federal government’s care, according to The Washington Post. Lloyd has even personally intervened. The Washington Post also reports that Lloyd built his career on pushing for religious values and has taken those views into the federal government.

ACLU lawyers are fighting against what they claim is a new tactic under the Trump administration to force unaccompanied minors to carry their pregnancies to term, even against their will.

The ORR takes these young women to religiously-affiliated, anti-abortion crisis centers, and block them from medical appointments related to abortion services.

In the case of Jane Doe earlier this year, ACLU lawyers were successful in winning the young woman the right to terminate her pregnancy. The court battle took a month as one court after another heard arguments in favor and against Doe’s right to choose. In the end, an appeals court ruled that the federal government had to allow Doe to terminate the pregnancy. Doe had the abortion the day after the decision was handed down.


READ: The Undocumented Teen Fighting In Court For Access To An Abortion Finally Got It

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More Undocumented Women Are Having Miscarriages While Being Detained Under The Trump Administration

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More Undocumented Women Are Having Miscarriages While Being Detained Under The Trump Administration

Conditions inside an immigration detention center are far from pleasant. They can also be worse than a jail cell. For the countless of undocumented immigrants seeking asylum or waiting to be released from these so-called hieleras (which means ice box in Spanish for their freezing temperatures) can unfortunately be the difference between life and death.

Last week a 24-year-old immigrant from Honduras had a stillborn baby six months into her pregnancy inside an immigration detention center. Politicians and organizations are now seeing that stillborn causalities and miscarriages is not isolated incidences but rather a problematic trend that has affected a number of pregnant detained women.

A new report shows that undocomunted women are experiencing more miscarriages while being detained has doubled under the Trump Administration.

Congressman Joaquin Castro and Chairman of the Hispanic Caucus said in a press release made available to us that “Medical experts have stated that detention centers do not have the necessary medical facilities to properly care for expectant mothers and that they should be released in a timely manner.” However, that hasn’t been the case. Pregnant women are detained for longer periods of time rather than be released.

Rep. Castro said that because the Trump Administration continues to detain pregnant women instead of releasing them, that is resulting in higher number of miscarriages.

“Last year the Trump Administration announced that it would detain most pregnant migrants instead of releasing them as the previous administration chose to do,” Rep. Castro said. “As a result of this cruel policy change, we have heard several alarming stories of pregnant women receiving inadequate medical care and even miscarrying while in DHS custody. These tragedies make one thing very clear: ICE and CBP should not be detaining expectant mothers in poor conditions, and the practice of detaining these women is inhumane and inconsistent with our values as Americans. We must examine the circumstances of the unfortunate and disturbing loss of this mother’s child. These agencies should reverse the policy changes that are hurting expectant mothers and instead work to protect the health and safety of all immigrants.”

To show the increase of miscarriages under the Trump Administration: 10 undocumented women had miscarriages between  October 2016 and September 2017. During the same review the following year, 18 undocumented women had miscarriages, the Daily Beast reports. That means the number continues to increase.

In 2017, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and seven other organizations filed a complaint with the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties and its Office of Inspector General detailing the conditions for all detained people.

“There is a troubling pattern of medical negligence and disregard for humanity in the way ICE and CBP are allowed to operate under the Trump Administration,” Congresswoman Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, and the Hispanic Caucus Women’s Task Force Chair said in a statement made available to us. “I fear this tragedy could be a consequence of that negligence. I call on the Administration to be transparent and perform a thorough investigation, so we can know what exactly happened and what can be done to prevent this from happening in the future.”

READ: A Woman Who Had A Miscarriage Was Denied Access To Her Prescription Because Of A Pharmacist’s Beliefs

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Are You A Victim Of Abuse? Use This Checklist To Help You Determine The Truth

Calladitas No More

Are You A Victim Of Abuse? Use This Checklist To Help You Determine The Truth

There are three ways that abuse can be identified. By the way your partner treats you physically, by the way they treat you emotionally, and by how you feel about the relationship. This checklist of twenty signs of abuse is one tool that you can use to see if you, or someone you know, is a victim of abuse. And remember, more resources for dealing with abuse can be found by calling The National Domestic Violence Hotline on 1800 799 7233.

1. They have grabbed you and refused to let go.

gabkaphoto / Instagram

This falls into the category of physical abuse. No-one should grab you to make you feel threatened and unsafe. No-one.

2. They have pulled your hair.

Instagram: @theerinblythedavis

This is another form of physical abuse. Sure, a bit of hair pulling in the act of passion is fine. But when it happens as part of an argument, or when your partner is deliberately trying to hurt you or make you feel threatened, that is abuse.

3. They have thrown things at you and/or destroyed your belongings.

Instagram: @beatfreak1996

One way your significant other may try to control you is through your belongings. Throwing things at you and destroying your belongings is designed to hurt you physically and emotionally. Threatening to do so also falls under this category of behavior, too.

4. They have left you with bruises, black eyes, bleeding, and/or broken bones.

Instagram: @veeegooose

While abuse doesn’t necessarily have to leave marks on your body, a sure sign of physical abuse in your relationship is when your partner does leave marks. Research shows that once it happens the first time, a “threshold” of sorts has been crossed, and an abuser is more likely to hurt their partner again.

5. They have threatened to hurt or kill you.

Instagram: @raquelitt

It may not seem like abuse, since there are no physical marks left from a threat to hurt or kill you. However, these threats are still part of the arsenal of tools that abusers use. How? Because these threats are designed to control your behavior, and make you feel powerless. Abuse in a relationship is about the abuser gaining and maintaining power, and death threats are a way of emotionally controlling you.

6. They have threatened to take your children away or harm them.

Instagram: @stephaniemaurasanchez

Even if you have children together, children shouldn’t be used as a bargaining chip in your relationship. Even more importantly, your children’s safety is non-negotiable: no partner of yours should threaten it. By the way, this doesn’t just apply to children. Pets can also be used to manipulate and control you in a relationship.

7. They have forced you to have sex.

Instagram: @jennylikesjewellery

Sex is not a “duty” to be fulfilled in a loving, equal relationship. Nor should your partner guilt trip or manipulate you into participating in sex acts after you have refused sex. Consent needs to be freely given! It doesn’t matter how long the two of you have been together. Otherwise, it’s classed as sexual assault.

8. They try to control you and treat you like a child.

Instagram: @silvia_almanza

Abusive relationships are about control and power. Part of treating you like a child is making you feel like you don’t have any control in the relationship, or even your life, so that you continue to stay and endure the abuse.

9. They make you feel like you need permission to make decisions or go somewhere.

Instagram: @kreeturefeature

This applies when you feel like you have to text at every moment to update your partner about where you are. And when you can’t spend time with friends or family without getting permission from your partner. This is because abusers commonly try to isolate their partner from other, platonic relationships with other people.

10. They try to take complete control of the finances and how you spend money.

Instagram: @loudmouthbruja

Controlling how money is earned and spent is known as financial abuse. People suffering from this type of abuse are commonly denied access to money by partners for doing simple tasks like grocery shopping. Or, sometimes the abuser decides whether and when their partner is allowed to work.

11. They cannot admit to being wrong.

Instagram: @abs_ter

Part of being in a respectful and loving relationship is being able to say sorry and to admit fault. An abusive partner refuses to apologise, because doing so would threaten their position of power in their relationship.

12. They accuse you of things that you know are not true.

Instagram: @estephaniaabarca

This is about control, and manipulating you. After all, if you’re spending your time trying to prove your innocence, then you’re not going to spend your time planning to leave the relationship, are you?

13. They do not take responsibility for their behavior.

Instagram: @lu.pazmi

The reality is, it’s not too much to ask someone to take responsibility for their behavior – even more so when it’s someone you’re in a relationship with. However, your partner doesn’t take responsibility for their behavior because doing so would threaten their position of power in the relationship.

14. They use “The Silent Treatment” to get their way.

Instagram: @yappaririri

Chances are you may have experienced “The Silent Treatment” before, in elementary school. And that’s where that behavior should stay. An equal, loving relationship is not built on one person using silence to manipulate the other person into conceding a point.

15. They make subtle threats or negative remarks about you.

Instagram: @noshophotography

Of course, there’s always room for some friendly sledging in a loving, respectful relationship. But, it turns into abuse when your partner does this on a regular basis to frighten, or control you. It’s possible they may even pass it off as a “joke”, or say that you’re “overreacting”. But again, if you’re in a loving relationship, then your partner should respect the fact that you’re hurt by a “joke”. They should not continue to make these types of comments.

16. You feel scared about how your significant other will act.

Instagram: @erikakardol

Repeat after us: you should have no reason to fear your partner in a loving, respectful relationship. You should have no reason to fear your partner in a loving, respectful relationship.

17. You feel that you can help your partner to change their behavior.

Instagram: @amnesia.r

But, only if you have changed something about yourself first.

18. You watch your behavior carefully so that you do not start a conflict in your relationship.

Instagram: @cmirandads

An abuser does not abuse all of the time. They maintain a cycle of abuse in the relationship. Things go from being tense, where you feel like you have to watch your own actions, to an incident which involves verbal, emotional, financial and physical abuse. Then, your partner attempts reconciliation or denies the abuse occurred, and the relationship goes into a calm stage. However, tensions will begin to build before long, starting the cycle once again.

19. You stay with your partner because you are afraid of what they would do if you broke up.

Instagram: @msstefniv

In other words, you feel trapped in your relationship because of your partner’s current, or potential, behavior. This can range from hurting you, your kids, your pets, your friends, and your family. Or, destroying your belongings, compromising access to your finances, or hurting themselves.

20. They don’t pass “The No Test”

Instagram: @kaitlyn_laurido

“The No Test” is pretty simple. Observe what happens the next time you tell your partner “no”. This could be in response to being asked out on a date, or maybe doing them a simple favor. Disappointment is a normal response to being told “no.”  However, pure outrage, violence, and/or emotional manipulation is not a reasonable response, and may indicate an abusive relationship.

If you feel that you are experiencing an abusive relationship, please seek help. Call The National Domestic Violence Hotline on 1800 799 7233 for assistance. Please take care if you feel that your internet or mobile phone device use is being monitored.

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