Here’s What Major Publishers Have To Say About The Top Latina Books You Should Be Reading For Women’s History Month

credit: Amazon.com

A good book will either pull you in and remind you of yourself or, help you to lose yourself. Latinas have been mastering the art of storytelling for decades, crafting and weaving tales of our culture and experience to help themselves and others to understand their own cultural experiences.  has been just one of the many talents they have been able to sharpen and hone.

In the spirit of Women’s History Month here’s a list of 9 books written by Latinas that are totally worth a read.

Women Hollering Creek: And Other Stories by Sandra Cisneros

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“A collection of stories, whose characters give voice to the vibrant and varied life on both sides of the Mexican border. The women in these stories offer tales of pure discovery, filled with moments of infinite and intimate wisdom.” — From the Inside Flap

This Bridge Called My Back by Cherríe Moraga, Gloria Anzaldúa

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“When it was published in 1981, This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color was a vermilion ink bloom on the crisp white wedding dress of the U.S. feminist movement. It was meant to be shocking. This anthology of prose and poetry by Black, Latina, Asian, and Native American women was the first to express loudly, clearly, bilingually that the ‘sisterhood’ could not be colorblind. Women of color are not the same as white women. They experience America differently.” —  The Huffington Post

Corazón by Yesika Salgado

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“Corazón is a love story. It is about the constant hunger for love. It is about feeding that hunger with another person and finding that sometimes it isn’t enough. Salgado creates a world in which the heart can live anywhere; her fat brown body, her parents home country, a lover, a toothbrush, a mango, or a song.” —Amazon

Women with Big Eyes by Ángeles Mastretta

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“Thirty-nine indomitable aunts are captured in a series of lyrical snapshots in this autobiographically inspired collection, a bestseller in the award-winning author’s native Mexico. Mastretta (Lovesick) originally conceived these brief stories as a way of telling her daughter about her long line of powerful female ancestors; the resulting fictional series of portraits delivers charming lessons in life and love.”—Publishers Weekly

You Don’t Have To Like Me: Essays on Growing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding Feminism by Alida Nugent

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“In this series of entertaining essays, popular blogger and author Nugent (Don’t Worry, It Gets Worse) documents her journey to feminism while skewering misogynist tropes and delivering some painful truths. Using her own experiences to expand on larger issues, Nugent bravely confides the details of her battle with bulimia and society’s ever-shifting idea of the perfect body…”Publishers Weekly

A Cup of Water Under My Bed by Daisy Hernández

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“[Hernández] examines the warmth and pain she found in her relationships with her family, the varied reactions they had when she came out as bisexual, and the cognitive dissonance she experienced as she became upwardly mobile. Throughout, she talks about the power of reshaping your experiences through narrative, of taking the past apart and putting it back together in a way that makes sense to you and makes it truly your own.”—The Huffington Post 

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“I strongly encourage you to read Juliet Takes a Breath. It’s quite dazzling, funny as hell, poignant, all the things.Roxane Gay

I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika L. Sánchez

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“Why isn’t 15-year-old Julia Reyes a perfect Mexican daughter in her mother’s eyes? Mostly because of her older sister, Olga, who puts family first, listens to her parents, and dresses conservatively. Julia, by contrast, argues with her mother, talks back at school, and dreams of becoming a famous writer. When Olga dies suddenly, Julia is left wishing that they had been closer and grieving what she sees as Olga’s wasted life. And when she starts to suspect that Olga might not have been so perfect, she follows every clue.”Publishers Weekly

The Ladies of Managua by Eleni Gage

“Three generations . . . confront the tumultuous history of their country and their family in this vibrant story about radical acts of womanhood.” ―O Magazine

Sudden Death by Álvaro Enrigue

CREDIT: Amazon.com

“Sudden Death shows us that games are never merely games, because no game is played without consequences — some of which then permanently clouding our ability to look back and understand the procession of bodies that enable our play, our culture.” —Los Angeles Times 

 

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