things that matter

In Brazil, Four Women Have Been Killed Every Day This Year

Since the start of 2019, four women have been killed daily in Brazil — and human rights leaders want the South American country to tackle the gender violence crisis more aggressively.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), the human rights arm of the 35-member Organization of American States, described the deaths as “alarming” and stressed that more needs to be done to combat violence against women at its roots.

“The commission calls on the Brazilian State to implement comprehensive strategies to prevent these acts, fulfill its obligation to investigate, prosecute and punish those responsible, as well as to offer protection and comprehensive reparation to all victims,” the Washington-based IACHR said in a statement.

In 2015, Brazil, joining nations across Latin America, took its first major step to address the growing killing of women, passing a law that gave a legal definition to the crime — femicide — and instituting jail sentences for convicted offenders up to 30 years.

But, nearly five years later, IACHR is calling for the Brazilian government to do more, particularly in strengthening prevention and protection measures.

“It is inadmissible that women with protection orders are murdered, that they do not have sufficient shelters or that their complaints are not properly taken into consideration,” Commissioner Margarette May, IACHR’s president and rapporteur for women’s rights, said.

According to Human Rights Watch, while Brazil, the largest country in Latin America, has a population of more than 200 million, there are only 74 shelters for survivors of domestic violence in the nation.

IACHR added that many of the fatal victims of gender violence in Brazil, disproportionately Black, Indigenous and queer women, are often shot dead in their own homes by current or former intimate partners who have a history of abuse.

“The commission notes with concern that in most cases, the murdered women had previously denounced their aggressors, faced serious acts of domestic violence or suffered previous attacks or attempted homicides,” the IACHR said.

With Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s far-right president who has been compared to Donald Trump, taking office last month, activists are concerned the matter won’t be wholly addressed. As a candidate in 2018, Bolsonaro, who has already renamed the existing ministry of human rights to the ministry of women, family and human rights, combining indigenous rights with women’s issues, was the only person running for president who did not denounce the murder of Rio de Janeiro councilwoman and Afro-Brazilian defender of human rights Marielle Franco.

Read: One Of The Men Suspected In The Slaying Of Councilwoman Marielle Franco Has Been Arrested

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Study: Police In The Dominican Republic Are Abusing Women Sex Workers With Impunity

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Study: Police In The Dominican Republic Are Abusing Women Sex Workers With Impunity

Sex workers in the Dominican Republic, where the profession is illegal, are vulnerable to violence, but many don’t feel safe reporting these crimes to law enforcement because, in many cases, it’s police officers who are responsible for their abuse.

This month, Amnesty International released a report detailing how law enforcement in the Caribbean country rape and torture women sex workers. The study, harrowingly titled “If They Can Have Her, Why Can’t We,” includes interviews with 46 cis and trans sex workers who discuss the abuse they experienced at the hands of local police.

According to the report, of the 24 cis women interviewed, at least 10 had been raped by law enforcement, several at gunpoint. Similarly, many trans women disclosed being violently mistreated, some even tortured, by officers.

“The interviews reveal how a deeply engrained culture of machismo within the National Police, coupled with intense societal stigma and discrimination and conservative religious values, embolden law enforcement officials to unlawfully abuse their powers and punish women who engage in sex work as a form of social control,” reads the report.

One woman shared her account of being gang-raped by three policemen. In October 2017,  the woman was pulled over by an officer who spotted her waiting for clients when he forced her to enter his police van. There, he and two other patrols started groping the woman and ripping off her clothes.

“I was afraid. I was alone. I couldn’t defend myself. I had to let them do what they wanted with me,” she told Amnesty International. “They threatened me, that if I wasn’t with them they would kill me. They (said) that I was a whore, and so why not with them?”

The woman, whose shocking account influenced the title of the report, said that the officers called her a “bitch,” among other expletives, adding: “They saw me, I guess, and they thought ‘Well, if they (clients) can have her, why can’t we?’”

This mentality isn’t uncommon. The report notes that the government, and society at large, often views sex workers as less than human and are thus “deserving” of the violence they experience.

“The harrowing testimonies that Amnesty International has gathered from the Dominican Republic reveal that police routinely target and inflict sexual abuse and humiliation on women who sell sex with the purpose of punishing and discriminating against them,” Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas director at Amnesty International, said. “Under international law, such treatment can amount to gender-based torture and other ill-treatment.”

While this particular study looked at the problem in the Dominican Republic, Guevara-Rosas says police violence against sex workers isn’t unique to the region but rather follows a pattern of gender-based violence across Latin America and the Caribbean. She calls it an “epidemic” and notes that marginalized women, like sex workers, are at increased risk because of fear arrest.

Read: Mothers, Students And Teachers Protested — And Were Attacked By Police — At Puerto Rico’s May Day March

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One Of The Men Suspected In The Slaying Of Councilwoman Marielle Franco Has Been Arrested

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One Of The Men Suspected In The Slaying Of Councilwoman Marielle Franco Has Been Arrested

On Tuesday, Brazilian authorities announced that they had two suspects in the case of slain councilwoman Marielle Franco, who was admired and loathed for her advocacy around racial equality, women’s and LGBTQ rights and police brutality. Ten months after her March 2018 killing, Brazilian news outlet G1 reported that local police have arrested one suspect, Ronald Paulo Alves Pereira, while a second, Adriano Magalhães da Nóbrega, remains at large.

Pereira, a military police officer and militia commander, and Nóbregais, the leader of the Office of Crime for a militia that controls the Rio das Pedras neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro who is believed to be the hired assassin, both have ties to Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro, a newly-elected far-right leader who has been compared to President Donald Trump for his policies and treatment of LGBTQ individuals, women’s rights and the country’s Indigenous communities.

According to Broadly, Nóbregais and Pereira, who was being investigated for his alleged leading role in the death of five young people in Rio’s Baixada Fluminense district, were honored by senator-elect Flávio Bolsonaro, the president’s son, in the midst of the probe.

“I cannot be held accountable for the behavior of someone I do not know, whose actions have only been reported now by this organization,” Flávio wrote in a statement he shared on Twitter Tuesday.

After Franco’s death, then-presidential hopeful Bolsonaro was the only candidate to not make a statement addressing her killing, with his own campaign adviser saying that Bolsonaro’s opinion on the matter was “too controversial.” Both he and his son have also expressed approval of death squads like that of which Pereira and Nóbrega are a part of. In 2003, the president stated that groups like such “replaced the death penalty” in the country.

In addition to Pereira and Nóbrega, special units issued arrest warrants for 11 other men in relation to the organized crime.

Franco’s life and dedication to marginalized communities will be honored by one of Rio’s Samba Schools at Brazil’s carnival this year.

Read: Afro-Brazilian Councilwoman Marielle Franco Was Murdered And Her Supporters Believe It Was Retaliation For Her Progressive Politics

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