Latinas Are Rejoicing Over Indigenous ‘Roma’ Star Yalitza Aparicio’s Appearance On The Cover Of Vogue Mexico

As much of a force that women of color so often prove themselves to be, it’s only on very rare occasions that they are given an opportunity to be honored for their accomplishments and contributions by print and digital media. Today, magazines like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Elle still struggle to include even of the moment women of color. Surprisingly, the same is true for glossies based in countries where women of color make up the majority of the population. Even alternative editions of these magazines that are based in Latin America highlight this problem.

It’s why, when news that Vogue Mexico’s latest feature included a woman of color across its front cover, we were particularly surprised and blown away.

Indigenous actress Yalitza Aparicio is gracing the January issue of Vogue Mexico!

The Mexican-born “Roma” actress’s feature on Vogue Mexico’s January’s issue marks the first time the magazine has put a woman of indigenous origin on its cover. Speaking about her appearance on the magazine, Aparicio told the magazine in an accompanying video that her appearance means that “Certain stereotypes are being broken: that only people with a certain profile can be actresses or be on the cover of magazines. Other faces are now being recognized. It is something that makes me so happy and proud of my roots.”

If you haven’t seen “Roma” — which is currently on Netflix —  Aparicio is the star of Alfonso Cuarón’s film.

CREDIT: Instagram/@chilangocom

The film premiered at the Venice Film Festival in September and quickly gained the praise of critics and fans alike. It has already won countless awards and is also nominated for several Golden Globes including Best Foreign Film. Aparicio’s role as a maid and nanny of a middle-class family in Mexico City has captivated audiences and encouraged creators of the film to rally for an Oscar. The black-and-white film takes place in the early ’70s and touches on several socioeconomic and cultural issues, but at the heart of the movie is Cleo, who is based on Cuarón’s real nanny.

 

The 26-year-old, from Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca speaks Spanish and Mixteco, auditioned for the role of Cleo after her sister encouraged her to try out for the part. Before that, the actress had been in school pursuing a career as a teacher.  Cuarón auditioned countless of actresses, but once he met Aparicio, he knew he had found his leading lady. “We had armies of casting crews going through little villages in Oaxaca, a southern state in Mexico,” Cuaron told the Hollywood Reporter. “I was so lucky to have met her.”

Naturally, her performance in “Roma” has gotten her worldwide attention and is gaining her international acclaim.

CREDIT: Instagram/@yalitzaapariciomtz

She was recently asked if she’s considering doing more work as an actress, and she said that while she loved her role in “Roma” she hasn’t secured any new roles yet.

“I do realize that if I want to continue being in movies, I have to study to be an actress.”

Latinas are thanking the actress for her part in ensuring more diversity on screen and in media.

Let’s be real this cover is gonna be a collector’s edition.

Her cover style is the latest in Dior fashion.

She nails the look and is absolutely stunning!

Amen to this!

This cover is sure to sell out.

The world agrees with you.

They need more women of color featured in this magazine (and all magazines). Period!

Too many emotions.

Has Yalitza seen the response to this? She’ll be crying too!

This cover is the only thing that matters right now.

Saludos a ti, Yalitza!

Here’s a video from her shoot with Vogue Mexico where she shares more about her Oaxaqueñan roots.

“My skin, very Mexican, very Oaxaqueñan and very human. From the color of my land and the diversity of its colors,” she says in the video. “Certain stereotypes are being broken: that only people with a certain profile can be actresses or be on the cover of magazines. Other faces of Mexico are now being recognized. It is something that makes me so happy and proud of my roots.”

The magazine hits the newsstands on Dec. 27.

Read: 5 Indigenous Latinas To Follow And Support On Instagram This Indigenous Peoples’ Day

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