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Parkland Shooting Survivor Samantha Fuentes Is “Unimpressed” After Speaking With Trump

Survivors of the high school shooting in Parkland, Florida have been criticizing Washington’s hesitance to tackle gun violence, and Samantha Fuentes, a Latina teen who was recently discharged from the hospital after she was hit in the assault, is joining the roaring youth opposition movement.

While Fuentes, an 18-year-old senior at Marjory Douglas High School, was recovering from shooting wounds on both her legs, she received a call from President Donald Trump. Instead of feeling optimistic after her call with the commander-in-chief, however, she felt more concerned.

“He said he heard that I was a big fan of his, and then he said, ‘I’m a big fan of yours, too.’ I’m pretty sure he made that up,” the teen told the New York Times on Thursday. “Talking to the president, I’ve never been so unimpressed by a person in my life. He didn’t make me feel better in the slightest.”

She added that the president referred to the gunman, Nikolas Cruz, as a “sick puppy” and said “‘oh boy, oh boy, oh boy,’ like, seven times.”

Fuentes, who was left with a piece of shrapnel behind her right eye, will have to meet with specialists to get the fragment removed. Still, she plans on taking on the battle that her fellow classmates have embarked on while she was being treated: gun reform.

“I don’t know how Columbine wasn’t enough. I don’t know Sandy Hook was not enough. I don’t know how the Las Vegas shooting was not enough. I don’t know how the Pulse nightclub was not enough. I don’t know how any of it was not enough. But now it is,” she said Wednesday on The Today Show. “This is enough for me. This is enough for my message, this is enough for my platform, and I’m not gonna let anyone stop me. You don’t know the pain until it happens to you. You don’t know the fear and the sorrow and the disappointment and the complete and utter rage until it happens to you. And the truth is is that it doesn’t have to keep happening.”

The teen, who knew Cruz from the school’s Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, said shots were fired through a pane near her classroom’s locked door. Two of her classmates were killed.

That day, her class was learning about hate groups and the history of the Holocaust.

Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

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After Two Parkland Students Commit Suicide, Community Unites To Share Mental Health Resources

One year after the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., two students have died in apparent suicides, compelling the community to come together and share mental health resources.

On Saturday, a sophomore at the school, where 17 people were killed in a mass shooting last year, took his own life. One week prior, Sydney Aiello, 19, a recent Stoneman Douglas graduate who lost her best friend in the massacre, also ended her life.

As the Florida’s emergency chief Jared Moskowitz calls for the state Legislature to send more mental health resources for the high school’s students and faculty, calling mental health a “bipartisan issue” on Twitter, the community has stepped in where the state government has been slow to respond.

On Sunday, more than 60 school, county, city, child services and law enforcement officials, as well as mental health specialists, teachers and parents, met for an emergency meeting. Ryan Petty, father of Alaina Petty, a 14-year-old freshman who was murdered on Feb. 14. 2018, said that the school district will be giving parents the “Columbia Protocol, six questions that parents should ask their children, the Miami Herald reports. Based on their answers, they will know what emergency resources are available to them. Additionally, nonprofits are offering free therapy groups and services.

Online, it’s students, former and current, who are using social media to offer resources to those still suffering from the trauma and loss of last year’s school shooting. David Hogg, who graduated from Stoneman Douglas in 2018 and has become a fierce anti-gun advocate, took to Twitter, reminding Parkland students and grads that trauma doesn’t go away quickly.

“Stop saying you’ll get over it,'” he wrote. “You don’t get over something that never should have happened because those that die from gun violence are stolen from us not naturally lost. Trauma and loss don’t just go away, you have to learn to live with it through getting support.”

According to Dr. Joy Harden Bradford, who spoke with Teen Vogue, witnessing traumatic events can lead to symptoms consistent with acute stress disorder, including recurring memories, dreams or nightmares of the event; mood changes; irritability and more. These memories, she adds, can lead to negative thoughts, hopelessness, trouble sleeping and more.

Hogg wants youth to know that these symptoms are normal and that they can be managed through help, like therapy, talking with friends and family, meditation and self-care practices.

He, along with others, shared his own self-care routine.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, know there is help available. For immediate support, call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. If you’re experiencing a mental health crisis and are unsure where to turn, you can also reach out to the Crisis Text Line by sending HOME to 741741.

Read: Survivor Of Florida School Shooting Emma Gonzalez Is Turning Her Anger Into Political Activism

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Emma González Is Using A Costume She Wore For Halloween A Few Years Ago To Remind Us Of The Nightmare She Survived

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Emma González Is Using A Costume She Wore For Halloween A Few Years Ago To Remind Us Of The Nightmare She Survived

Friday, April 20, marked two major events that anti-gun violence advocates have hoped will bring about change. Not only did the date fall on the anniversary of the 1999 Columbine School Shooting that ravaged a small town in Colorado it also marked the country’s second National School Walkout of the year.

To show solidary with both victims of the school shooting at Columbine and the latest anti-gun violence movement, activist and leader Emma González dressed up.

Gonzalez redefined the color orange declaring it as a color for gun violence survivors on Twitter.

González posted two pictures of herself on the social media platform on Friday, both of which depicted her in an orange jumpsuit. The second photo featured the letters MSD on her back, which stand for her high school Marjory Stoneman Douglas where she and other students witnessed a shooter kill 17 fellow students and teachers this past February. González captioned the image with a message that read “Orange is the color for gun violence survivors, and we wear it today in solidarity of one another.”

González went onto explain that she had once used her orange jumpsuit for Halloween but was now using it solidarity with the 2015 movement #WearOrange. The hashtag was started by the family and friends Hadiya Pendleton, a 15-year-old girl who was murdered in Chicago in 2013 after she was shot while leaving her school. Pendleton’s supporters chose the color to mirror on hunters who wear it to be seen while in the woods.

González further explained how the color also serves as a reflection of the way she and her peers have felt at their school in the wake of the shooting.

“This prisoner jumpsuit was my Halloween costume 2 years ago (OITNB),” she wrote. “But I wore it today because our schools are looking more like prisons and bomb shelters and less like the learning institutes our parents had the privilege of enjoying.”

Weeks after the shooting, Stoneman Douglas students returned to their school feeling invaded by new school policies that they complained made them feel like prisoners in their own school. In an attempt to prevent further incidents of gun violence, the school issued a slew of requirements for students including holding IDs on them at all times and using transparent plastic backpacks in place of the bags that carried their textbooks before the shooting.

Read: Emma González Opened Up To Ellen DeGeneres About Why She Chose To Call Out B.S. To ‘Get The Job Done Properly’

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