A Transgender Latina Who Was Deported From The US Was Murdered In El Salvador

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A transgender woman who was deported from the US after seeking refuge from anti-LGBTQ violence in her homeland was murdered following her return to El Salvador, the Washington Blade reports.

When the woman, who was known as Camila, went missing, the Asociación Aspidh Arcoiris Trans, a trans advocacy group in the Central American country, started a search and discovered that she had been admitted to a hospital in San Salvador, the nation’s capital, on Jan. 31. She passed away on Feb. 3.

Authorities are still unsure what happened during the attack, but she was found outside the capital and transported to Rosales National Hospital with “multiple injuries.”

Camila entered the US on one of the migrant caravans last year after receiving threats because of her gender identity. According to Salvadoran activists, US officials did not believe her life was in danger and deported her back to her home country four-to-five months before her death.

“She migrated to the US because of threats that she had received, but she was deported because they didn’t believe her,” Aislinn Odaly, an independent LGBTI rights advocate, told the publication.

Camila is the second trans woman who was murdered in El Salvador this month. On Feb. 8, a woman named Lolita was killed with a machete in Sonsonate, but there are little more details surrounding her death.

According to the Washington Blade, neither El Salvador’s National Civil Police nor the country’s attorney general has classified the murders as hate crimes, particularly because Lolita and Camila died in public hospitals where reports didn’t identify them as victims of violence.

“We want justice and that these cases are investigated and the reformed penal code procedures to be applied when those who are responsible are found,” Alfaro told the Blade, alluding to a 2015 amendment to El Salvador’s legal code that enhances penalties for hate crimes based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

“Although we have begun the year badly, we hope these crimes establish precedents for there to also be a positive legal framework that regulates the situation of trans people, especially the situation of violence and insecurity,” she continued.

Read: In Chile, This School For Transgender Students Allows Kids To Learn In A Safe And Affirming Environment

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