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People On Twitter Are Dragging The Victoria’s Secret Show For Committing Cultural Appropriation In Its Show, Yet Again

The 2017 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, which aired Tuesday night, was plagued by a series of hot messes almost from the start.

First, various models and talent meant to be featured in the show, which took place in Shanghai, failed to secure visas, including model Gigi Hadid. Though her absence was suspected to be over racist behavior. Then media outlets and bloggers had a hard time getting permission from Chinese bureaucrats to film the event at all.

Once the show aired, it was filled with some pretty cringeworthy moments of cultural appropriation, models caught singing the N-word, no models above a size 4 and a TV edit that has Twitter and Chrissy Tiegan epically POed. It felt more like a shit show than fashion show.

Here’s an outline of the hot mess moments from the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show. Hold on to your bra straps, this one’s a ride.

When word got out that VS’s theme this year was “Nomadic Adventure,” there’s no doubt the woke fans of VS took a big gulp and held their breath.

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Mostly because, no matter how well its models can strut down a runway, when it comes to mastering cultural sensitivity, the brand has a history of repeatedly falling flat on its own face. VS’s continues to make the same offenses, and this year proved to be no different. As models marched down the runway, audiences watched them wear a display of feathered headdresses, beaded body jewelry and neck rings.

On Twitter, the ensembles from the show were met with pretty intense slap downs, especially when, once again, the brand appropriated various cultures.

Not only did were they guilty of cultural appropriation, many also bemoaned the fact that the company paraded costumes that poorly represented cultures.

But it wasn’t until after the show’s airing that the caca really hit the fan, after models were caught singing the N-word.

A backstage video from the fashion show revealed a room full of models singing the lyrics to Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow.” Their performance also included singing the N-word along with the music. Twitter users were quick to point out that a majority of the models in the video were not Black (which all of us already know is pretty much business as usual for the brand).

So far, none of the models in the video have commented about the incident, but Twitter had plenty to say about it.

Most critics of the video underlined a key reason why the women shouldn’t have felt comfortable saying the word.

Oh, and it doesn’t end there. Producers decided to feature and play up the moment model, Ming Xi, fell, but cut out when fellow model, Gizele Oliveira, helped her up.

For many, it felt like an empowering moment where we got to see one woman help another. But the big fall and what followed – Xi walking off stage in tears – proved to be too juicy for producers to cut. Oliveira’s part in the incident was left on the editing floor and Xi tears of horror were included. ?

Viewers from last night were hardly thrilled by the decision to keep the image of the model falling and crying.

Most expressed their disappointment in CBS’ decision to air the segment because it was ultimately just an embarrassing moment for Xi. Especially considering it could have easily been left out since they film the show twice to make sure they get everything right.

Even a few celebrities dragged them for it.

For many, the decision to air the segment felt like an attempt to play up the drama of the show, and many were unimpressed.

Here’s hoping the brand will do better next year.


Read: This Latina Model Has A Growing Clothing Line For ALL Women

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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

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The Spanish ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ Is Being Shared To Honor Hispanic Workers Fighting COVID-19

There’s no denying that the world looks a lot different now than it did in 1947. And while the list of all of the positive changes that the decades stretching between now and then have done for the world and minorities, a recent campaign is also highlighting the ways in which our current president could take some notes on certain values the United States held dear during this time. Particularly ones that had been pressed for by one of our former presidents.

As part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Good Neighbor Policy” effort, he worked to promote positive and healthy relations between the United States in Latin American countries.

At the time Rooseveltaimed to ensure that the North, Central and South American countries avoided breaking under the influence of Axis countries during World War II. As part of this campaign, Roosevelt comissioned a Spanish and a Portuguese version of the U.S. national anthem. According to Time Magazine he also “recruited Hollywood to participate in this Good Neighbor Policy; Walt Disney went on goodwill tour of South America, hoping to find a new market for his films, and ended up producing two movies inspired by the trip: Saludos Amigos (1942) and The Three Caballeros (1944). The Brazilian star Carmen Miranda also got a boost, and her role in The Gang’s All Here made her even more famous in the U.S. And alongside these cross-cultural exchanges, the U.S. government decided it needed an anthem that could reach Spanish speakers.”

According to NPR, Clotilde Arias, wrote wrote the translation at the end of World War II, was born in the small Peruvian city, Iquitos in 1901 and moved to New York City to become a composer when she was 22-years-old. Her version of the anthem is now part of an exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Now in an effort to support Latino communities affected by the coronavirus, the non-profit We Are All Human Foundation’s Hispanic Star campaign commissioned the a remake of the song.

Hoping to raise awareness of its Hispanic Recovery Plan and efforts to help to connect Hispanic small businesses and workers with resources during the pandemic, the campaign brought the old recording from obscurity.

For the song, the 2019 winner of the singing competition La Voz,  Jeidimar Rijos, performed “El Pendón Estrellado.” Or, “The Star-Spangled Banner.” 

The song has already received quite a bit of comments and support on Youtube.

Hang in there, fam. We can only get through this together.

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20 Photos That Document The History, Vibrant Past, And Uncertain Future Of Cuba

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20 Photos That Document The History, Vibrant Past, And Uncertain Future Of Cuba

It doesn’t take a photo to fall in love with the rich culture and historical background the island and country of Cuba has to offer. These photos of the country, however, will give you insight into its complicated history, passionate people, and uncertain future.

Martí y María Mantilla


Beloved Cuban poet, essayist and professor, José Julián Martí Perez became a symbol of Cuban’s bid for independence against Spain in the 19th century. Amongst Cubans he is considered the “Apostle of Cuban Independence.” In the photo above, Martí is pictured with his daughter María Mantilla, daughter of Carmen Miyares de Mantilla, a Venezuelan who ran a boarding house in New York.

Celia Cruz Cuba circa 1950s.


The Afro-Cubana sings with Ester Borja and Isidro Camara.

Babies flee Cuba

George Barilla / Pinterest.com

Operation Peter Pan (or Operación Pedro Pan) was a mass exodus of over 14,000 unaccompanied Cuban minors to the United States between 1960 and 1962. Father Bryan O. Walsh of the Catholic Welfare Bureau created the program to provide air transportation to the United States for Cuban children. It operated without publicity out of fear that it would be viewed as an anti-Castro political enterprise.

Fidel Castro in Hemingway Museum

(Photo by Jorge Rey/Getty Images)


Havana, Cuba- November 11, 2002. An old manual typewriter sits in Finca de Vigia, the villa where author Ernest Hemingway lived from 1939-1960. Cuban President Fidel Castro and an American group led by U.S. Rep. James McGovern (D-MA) signed an agreement to collaborate on the restoration and preservation of 2,000 letters, 3,000 personal photographs and some draft fragments of novels and stories that were kept in the humid basement of the villa.

Maria Colon

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July 1980. Olympic Champion Maria Colon of Cuba throws the javelin at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, USA.

Gloria Estefan and Miami Sound Machine

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Backed by Miami Sound Machine, Cuban singer Gloria Estefan does the conga during the 1988 AMAs.

1991 International Basball All-Star Game

(Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)


Los Angeles – August 24 1991: Cuban baseball player Omar Luis steps up to bat during the International Baseball All-Star Game on August 24, 1991 at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California.

Boxing Legends

(Photo by Jorge Rey/Liaison

January 1996. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali (left) playfully spars with beloved Cuban boxer Teofilo Stevenson, a 3-time Olympic gold medalist in the Roberto Balado boxing gym in Havana, Cuba. Ali toured the island as part of a mission to bring aid to Cuban hospitals.

Federal agents seized Elián González.

bruce_wayne11/ Instagram

April 2000. Cuban citizen Elián González is held in a closet by Donato Dalrymple, in Miami as Federal agent Jim Goldman retrieves him from his relatives home. Elián was returned to his father’s custody four hours after the raid but only returned to the U.S. seven months and one week after he left Cuba.

Concierto Para Los Heroes Benefit

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.


September 14, 2001. Celia Cruz perfoms at the ‘Concierto Para Los Heroes’ benefit sponsored by The Recording Academy at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles, Ca. The benefit was given for the families of fallen firefighters and police officers of New York City of the September 11 attacks.

Jimmy Carter Visits Cuba

(Photo by Jorge Rey/Getty Images)


Havana, Cuba- May 12, 2002. Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife Rosalin Carter tour the Center of Old with Havana City historian Eusebio Leal (L). Carter is on a six-day visit to Cuba and is the first American president to visit the communist island since Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

Cubans Manage Despite 40-Year U.S. Embargo

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Pinar Del Rio, Cuba- October 5, 2002. A person holds out a food rations card October 5, 2002 in Pinar Del Rio, Cuba. The “supplies booklet” or “rations booklet” as Cubans call it has come to symbolize the failure of Cuba’s agricultural sector and the communist government’s stubborn demand for an egalitarian subsidy for each one of its 11 million people. Cubans play less than $2 for the items they receive under the ration card whose supply only lasts up to 20 days out of each month.

With the booklet, each Cuban is meant to receive a monthly ration of seven lbs of rice, half a bottle of cooking oil, one sandwich-sized piece of bread per day, a certain ammount of eggs, beans, chicken or fish, spaghetti, white and brown sugar and cooking gas.

Children get one liter of milk and yogurt while diabetics get special booklets for their diets. For those celebrating special occasions, there are also rations— cakes for birthdays, rum and beer for weddings. Students also recieve rations for uniforms, pencils, and notebooks for the start of the school year. Soap, toothpaste, salt, and liquid detergent have been cut from the rations for years.

Cuba Holds First Cuban Olympic Games

(Photo by Franco Origlia/Getty Images)


Havana, Cuba – November 29, 2002. A Cuban athlete performs the high jump during the first Cuban Olympic games at the Panamericano Stadium in Havana, Cuba. The 11th Pan American Games were held in Havana.

Celia Cruz’s Funeral

(Photo by Mark Mainz/Getty Images)

New York – July 22, 2003. Fans of Celia Cruz attend a public ceremony held in her honor at Woodlawn Cemetery after her death and before the casket was taken for a private burial July 22, 2003 in the Bronx borough of New York City.

Cubans Try To Defect In 1951 Chevy Truck

Photo by Gregory Ewald/ U.S. Coast Guard/ Getty Images


AT SEA – JULY 24, 2003. In this U.S. Coast Guard handout, Cuban migrants trying to reach the U.S. coast in Florida take a makeshift boat made out of a 1951 Chevrolet truck with a propeller driven off the drive shaft. After making it within 40 miles of Key West, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Key Largo returned the 12 Cuban migrants from the vessel back to Cuba.

Cuba Economy Struggles After Row With Europe

(Photo by Jorge Rey/Getty Images)


Havana- August 29, 2003. A woman sells newspapers in front of a market place. The island nation endures an extreme economic crisis in a dispute with the European Union, Cuba’s most important trade and investment partner as well as a major source for its tourism. The EU cut back on political contacts with Cuba in June 2003 after the mass arrest of 75 dissidents and the executions of three ferry hijackers trying to reach the U.S.

Cuba Celebrates Legacy Of Its Revolution

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)


Havana, Cuba December 2006. Fireworks explode over a el morro as a boat carries a sign that reads “Viva Fidel’ at midnight in honor of the dictator and the 50th-anniversary celebration of the forming of Cuba’s Revolutionary Armed Forces.

Pope Benedict XVI Holds Mass in Plaza de la Revolución ‘José Martí’ Havanna

(Photo by L’Osservatore Romano Vatican-Pool/Getty Images)

Havana, Cuba – March 29, 2012. Pope Benedict XVI holds Mass in Plaza de la Revolución ‘José Martí.

Gloria Estefan Receives The Golden Medals To The Merit In Fine Arts

(Photo by Carlos Alvarez/Getty Images)

Madrid Spain- July 23, 2019. Singer Gloria Estefan receives the Golden Medal to the Merit in Fine Arts from Spanish Minister of Culture Jose Guirao at the Royal Theater.


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